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LIVE JAZZ 
TONIGHT 


TICKET SALES 


CULTURE 

BUILDS 

FLORIDA 


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF STATE 
DIVISION OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS 


















ECONOMIC PROSPERITY 5 -arts 

THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF NONPROFIT ARTS & CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS & THEIR AUDIENCES 


in the State of Florida 




•• 

* CITIZENS FOR * 


florida arts, inc. 











Florida is rich in its arts and cultural diversity and each region of our state has its own unique 
flavor. From the Southern accents of North Florida to the Spanish flair of South Florida, and 
everything in between, Florida has it all. The vast diversity of our state is represented best by 
our thriving arts and cultural industry. 

The Arts and Economic Prosperity 5 report demonstrates that arts and culture are important 
contributors to Florida’s economy— to the tune of $4.68 billion. The not-for-profit arts and 
cultural industry also supports 132,366 jobs and returns nearly $500 million in revenue to loca 
and state government. This sends a clear message that an investment in arts and culture is an 
investment in a strong Florida economy. 

In 2015, grant funds provided by Governor Rick Scott and the Florida Legislature and 
administered by the Division of Cultural Affairs created a return on investment for state and 
local governments of 9:1. Additionally, more than 41 million people, including 7.5 million 
children, participated in programs supported by these grants. People across Florida’s 67 
counties attended more than 42,750 events and 10.6 million visitors from out of state took 
part in Florida’s arts and cultural events, spending nearly twice as much per event as Florida 
residents. 

As Secretary of State and Chief Cultural Officer, I am proud of the tremendous benefits arts 
and culture bring to our state and our local communities. Museums and cultural organizations 
throughout Florida create jobs, stimulate tourism, and attract skilled workers while Florida’s 
artists foster creativity and make our communities distinct and vibrant. 

Across the state, arts and culture strengthen the economy and improve the quality of life for 
all Floridians. After reading this report, I'm sure you’ll agree that Culture Builds Florida. 



Ken Detzner 
Secretary of State 


Arts and Economic Prosperity® 5 was conducted by 
Americans for the Arts, the nation's nonprofit organization 
for advancing the arts in America. Established in 1960, we 
are dedicated to representing and serving local 
communities and creating opportunities for every American 
to participate in and appreciate all forms of the arts. 


Copyright 2017 by Americans for the Arts, 1000 Vermont Avenue NW, Sixth Floor, Washington, DC 20005. 
Arts & Economic Prosperity\s a registered trademark of Americans for the Arts. 

Reprinted by permission. 

Printed in the United States. 



Table of Contents 


The Arts Mean Business 1 

By Robert L. Lynch, President and CEO, Americans for the Arts 

The Economic Impact of the 
Nonprofit Arts and Culture Industry in 

the State of Florida 3 

Defining Economic Impact 3 

Economic Impact of the Nonprofit Arts and Culture 

Industry 4 

Direct, Indirect, and Induced Economic Impact: How a 

Dollar is Respent in the Economy 5 

Economic Impact of Spending by Nonprofit Arts and 

Cultural ORGANIZATIONS 6 

An Economic Impact Beyond Dollars: Volunteerism 7 

The Value of In-Kind Contributions to Arts 

Organizations 7 

Economic Impact of Spending by Nonprofit Arts and 

Cultural AUDIENCES 8 

Cultural Tourists Spend More 9 

The Arts Drive Tourism ]0 

The Arts Retain Local Dollars .10 

Travel Party and Demographic Characteristics of Arts 
Attendees 11 

Conclusion 13 

Arts & Economic Prosperity 5C alculator 15 

Economic Impact per $100,000 of Spending by 

Nonprofit Arts and Cultural ORGANIZATIONS 15 

Economic Impact per $100,000 of Spending by 

Nonprofit Arts and Cultural AUDIENCES 16 

Making Comparisons with Similar Study Regions .17 

About This Study 19 

Frequently Used Terms 25 



“The arts and culture industry helps to showcase the vast diversity 
and uniqueness of our state, drives tourism, creates jobs and 
contributes to the high quality of life enjoyed by Floridians and sought 
after by visitors. I am pleased to see arts and culture in Florida is 
thriving and I look forward to the industry's continued growth in years 
to come.” 

— Florida Governor Rick Scott 



The Arts Mean Business 

By Robert L. Lynch, President and CEO, Americans for the Arts 


In my travels, I meet business and government leaders who speak passionately about the value 
the arts bring to their communities— fueling creativity, beautifying downtowns, and providing joy. 
Many also share with me the challenge of balancing arts funding with the demands to support 
jobs and grow their economy. To these community leaders, Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 offers 
a clear and welcome message: the arts are an investment that delivers both community well- 
being and economic vitality. 


Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 (AEP5) is Americans for 
the Arts’ fifth economic impact study of the nation’s 
nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and their 
audiences. By every measure, the results are 
impressive. Nationally, the nonprofit arts industry 
generated $166.3 billion of economic activity in 2015— 
$63.8 billion in spending by arts and cultural 
organizations and an additional $102.5 billion in event- 
related expenditures by their audiences. This activity 
supported 4.6 million jobs and generated $27.5 billion 
in revenue to local, state, and federal governments (a 
yield well beyond their collective $5 billion in arts 
allocations). AEP5 is the most comprehensive study of 
its kind ever conducted. It provides detailed economic 
impact findings on 341 study regions representing all 
50 states and the District of Columbia. Data was 
gathered from 14,439 organizations and 212,691 arts 
event attendees, and our project economists 
customized input-output models for each and every 
study region to ensure reliable and actionable localized 
results. 

When Americans for the Arts published its first 
economic impact study in 1994, it worked with 33 local 
communities. As evidence of the value of these studies, 
AEP5 has grown this local participation ten-fold. We 
also have witnessed a corresponding growth in the 
understanding of the economic value of the arts. The 
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, for example, now 
publishes an annual Arts & Cultural Production Satellite 
Account, which extends beyond the nonprofit sector to 
include the full breadth of commercial and for-profit 
arts, education, and individual artists, and lists the 
sector as a $730 billion industry (4.2 percent of the 


nation’s GDP— a larger share of the economy than 
transportation, tourism, agriculture, and construction). 
As another example, many state and local governments 
have established agencies to track and grow their 
creative economy. 

What continues to set AEP5 apart from other studies is 
exactly why it is so useful: it uses localized research 
that not only focuses on arts organizations— but also 
incorporates the event-related spending by their 
audiences. When patrons attend an arts event, they 
may pay for parking, eat dinner at a restaurant, enjoy 
dessert after the show, and return home to pay the 
babysitter. The study found that the typical attendee 
spends $31.47 per person, per event beyond the cost of 
admission. AEP5 also shows that one-third of attendees 
(34 percent) traveled from outside the county in which 
the arts event took place. Their event-related spending 
was more than twice that of their local counterparts 
($47.57 vs. $23.44). What brought those visitors to 
town? Two-thirds (69 percent) indicated that the 
primary purpose for their visit was to attend that arts 
event. The message is clear: a vibrant arts community 
not only keeps residents and their discretionary 
spending close to home, it also attracts visitors who 
spend money and help local businesses thrive. 

AEP5 demonstrates that the arts provide both cultural 
and economic benefits. No longer do community 
leaders need to feel that a choice must be made 
between arts funding and economic development. 

Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 proves that they can 
choose both. Nationally as well as locally, the arts 
mean business. 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


1 


“Florida's magnificent climate for arts and culture inspires locals 
and attracts visitors, and who in turn, pair these experiences with 
world-class cuisine and premier lodging properties. Our state's 
tourism-based economy recognizes the significant economic value 
of arts and cultural event attendees whose average event-related 
spending per person of $33.53 injects revenue into local economies. 
A destination that flourishes in the arts and cultural activities has a 
unique advantage and competitive edge over other destinations" 

— Carol Dover 

President & CEO 

Florida Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association 


2 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 



The Economic Impact of the 
Nonprofit Arts and Culture Industry in 
the State of Florida 

Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 provides evidence that the nonprofit arts and 
culture sector is a significant industry in the State of Florida— one that generates 
$4.68 billion in total economic activity. This spending— $2.29 billion by nonprofit 
arts and cultural organizations and an additional $2.39 billion in event-related 
spending by their audiences— supports 132,366 full-time equivalent jobs, 
generates $3.35 billion in household income to local residents, and delivers 
$492.3 million in local and state government revenue. This economic impact 
study sends a strong signal that when we support the arts, we not only enhance 
our quality of life, but we also invest in the State of Florida's economic well-being. 


This Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 study documents 
the economic impact of the nonprofit arts and 
culture sector in 341 study regions— 113 cities, 115 
counties, 81 multicity or multicounty regions, 20 
states, and 12 arts districts— representing all 50 U.S. 
states and the District of Columbia. The diverse 
study regions range in population (1,500 to four 
million) and type (rural to large urban). Economists 
customized input-output models to calculate specific 
and reliable findings for each study region. This 
study focuses solely on the economic impact of 
nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and event- 
related spending by their audiences. Spending by 
individual artists and the for-profit arts and culture 
sector (e.g., Broadway or the motion picture 
industry) are excluded from this study. 

The geographic area analyzed in this unique report 
is defined as the State of Florida. 


Defining Economic Impact 


This proprietary study methodology uses four 
economic measures to define economic impact: full- 
time equivalent jobs, resident household income, and 
local and state government revenues. 

Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Jobs describes the total 
amount of labor employed. An FTE job can be one 
full-time employee, two half-time employees, etc. 
Economists measure FTE jobs, not the total number 
of employees, because it is a more accurate measure 
that accounts for part-time employment. 

Resident Household Income (often called Personal 
Income) includes salaries, wages, and entrepreneurial 
income paid to residents. It is the money residents 
earn and use to pay for food, shelter, utilities, and 
other living expenses. 

Revenue to Local and State Government includes 
revenue from local and state taxes (e.g., income, 
sales, lodging, real estate, personal property, and 
other local option taxes) as well as funds from license 
fees, utility fees, filing fees, and other similar sources. 
Local government revenue includes funds to 
governmental units such as city, county, township, 
and school districts, and other special districts. 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


3 



Economic Impact of Spending 

by the Nonprofit Arts and Culture Industry 

(Combined Spending by Both Organizations and Their Audiences) 
in the State of Florida 

In communities coast-to-coast, from our smallest towns to our largest cities, America’s 100,000 nonprofit 
arts and cultural organizations make their communities more desirable places to live and work every day of 
the year. 

The arts and culture provide inspiration and joy to residents, beautify public spaces, and strengthen the 
social fabric of our communities. Nonprofit arts and cultural organizations are also businesses. They employ 
people locally, purchase goods and services from other local businesses, and attract tourists. Event-related 
spending by arts audiences generates valuable revenue for local merchants such as restaurants, retail 
stores, parking garages, and hotels. 

During fiscal year 2015, spending by both the State of Florida’s nonprofit arts and cultural organizations 
and their audiences totaled $4.68 billion. The table below demonstrates the total economic impact of 
these expenditures. 


TABLE 1: 

Total Economic Impact of the Nonprofit Arts and Culture Industry in the State of Florida 

(Combined Spending by Nonprofit Arts and Cultural Organizations and Their Audiences) 


State of Florida 

Median of Participating 
Statewide Study Regions 

Total Industry Expenditures 

$4,676,207,338 

$835,040,012 

Full-Time Equivalent Jobs 

132,366 

25,972 

Resident Household Income 

$3,348,159,000 

$571,859,500 

Local Government Revenue 

$201,165,000 

$32,230,500 

State Government Revenue 

$291,176,000 

$44,062,000 


The Arts Improve the Economy ... and the Quality of our Personal Lives 


S 82 percent of Americans believe the arts & culture are important to local businesses and the 
economy 

^ 87 percent of Americans believe the arts & culture are important to quality of life 

Source: Americans for the Arts' 2016 survey of 3,020 adults by Ipsos Public Affairs 


4 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 



“The success of my family’s business depends on finding and cultivating 
a creative and innovative workforce. I have witnessed firsthand the 
power of the arts in building these business skills. When we participate 
personally in the arts, we strengthen our ‘creativity muscles,' which 
makes us not just a better ceramicist or chorus member, but a more 
creative worker— better able to identify challenges and innovative 
business solutions.” 

— Christopher Forbes 
Vice Chairman 
Forbes, Inc. 


Economic Impact: Total, Direct, Indirect, and Induced 


How can a dollar be respent? Consider the example of a theater company that purchases a five-gallon 
bucket of paint from its local hardware store for $100— a very simple transaction at the outset, but one 
that initiates a complex sequence of income and spending by both individuals and other businesses. 

Following the paint purchase, the hardware store may use a portion of the $100 to pay the 
sales clerk who sold the bucket of paint. The sales clerk then respends some of the money for 
groceries; the grocery store uses some of the money to pay its cashier; the cashier then spends 
some of the money for rent; and so on. 

The hardware store also uses some of the $100 to purchase goods and services from other 
businesses, such as the local utility company, and then to buy a new bucket of paint from the 
paint factory to restock its shelf. Those businesses, in turn, respend the money they earned from 
the hardware store to buy goods and services from still other local businesses, and so on. 

Eventually, the last of the $100 is spent outside of the community and no longer has a local 
economic impact. It is considered to have leaked out of the community. 

The total economic impact describes this full economic effect, starting with the theater’s initial paint 
purchase and ending when the last of the $100 leaks out of the community. It is composed of the direct 
economic impact (the effect of the initial expenditure by the theater), as well as the indirect and induced 
economic impacts, which are the effects of the subsequent rounds of spending by businesses and 
individuals, respectively. 

Interestingly, a dollar ripples very differently through each community, which is why an input-output model 
was customized for the unique economy of the State of Florida. 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


5 



Economic Impact of Spending 

by Nonprofit Arts and Cultural ORGANIZATIONS 

in the State of Florida 


Nonprofit arts and culture organizations are active contributors to their business community. They are 
employers, producers, and consumers. They are members of the Chamber of Commerce as well as key 
partners in the marketing and promotion of their cities, regions, and states. Spending by nonprofit arts and 
cultural organizations totaled $2.29 billion in the State of Florida during fiscal year 2015. This spending 
is far-reaching: organizations pay employees, purchase supplies, contract for services, and acquire assets 
within their community. These actions, in turn, support jobs, generate household income, and generate 
revenue to local and state governments. 

The State of Florida's nonprofit arts and cultural organizations provide rewarding employment for more 
than just administrators, artists, curators, choreographers, and musicians. They also employ financial staff, 
facility managers, and salespeople. In addition, the spending by these organizations directly supports a wide 
array of other occupations spanning many industries that provide their goods and services (e.g., accounting, 
construction, event planning, legal, logistics, printing, and technology). 

Data were collected from 1,688 eligible nonprofit arts and cultural organizations that are located in the 
State of Florida. Each provided detailed budget information for fiscal year 2015 (e.g., labor, payments to 
local and nonlocal artists, operations, administration, programming, facilities, and capital 
expenditures/asset acquisition). The following table demonstrates the total economic impact of their 
aggregate spending. 


TABLE 2: 

Total Economic Impact of Spending by Nonprofit Arts and Cultural ORGANIZATIONS 
in the State of Florida 


State of Florida 

Median of Participating 
Statewide Study Regions 

Total Organizational Expenditures 

$2,285,671,265 

$423,849,454 

Full-Time Equivalent Jobs 

72,108 

16,214 

Resident Household Income 

$1,967,176,000 

$360,046,000 

Local Government Revenue 

$87,300,000 

$14,323,500 

State Government Revenue 

$130,842,000 

$20,720,500 


6 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 



Economic Impact Beyond Dollars: Volunteerism 


While arts volunteers may not have an economic impact as defined in this study, they clearly have an 
enormous impact by helping nonprofit arts and cultural organizations function as a viable industry. Arts & 
Economic Prosperity 5 reveals a significant contribution to nonprofit arts and cultural organizations as a 
result of volunteerism. During 2015, a total of 121,264 volunteers donated a total of 6,522,918 hours to 
the State of Florida’s participating nonprofit arts and cultural organizations. This represents a donation 
of time with an estimated aggregate value of $153,679,948 (Independent Sector estimates the dollar 
value of the average 2015 volunteer hour to be $23.56). Volunteers can include unpaid professional staff 
(e.g., executive and program staff, board/commission members), artistic volunteers (e.g., artists, 
choreographers, designers), clerical volunteers, and service volunteers (e.g., ticket takers, docents, 
ushers, gift shop volunteers). 

The 1,688 participating organizations reported an average of 71.8 volunteers who volunteered an average 
of 53.8 hours during 2015, for a total of 3,864.3 hours per organization. 

The Value of In-Kind Contributions to Arts Organizations 

The organizations were asked about the sources and value of their in-kind support. In-kind contributions are 
non-cash donations such as materials (e.g., office supplies from a local retailer), facilities (e.g., office or 
performance space), and services (e.g., printing from a local printer). The 1,688 participating nonprofit arts 
and cultural organizations in the State of Florida reported that they received in-kind contributions with 
an aggregate value of $71,073,471 during fiscal year 2015. These contributions can be received from a 
variety of sources including corporations, individuals, local and state arts agencies, and government 
agencies. 


“Arts and culture are vital to the future of Florida. Count these as 
investments in community development, as investments in a quality 
workforce and an innovation economy. Arts and culture is the ingredient 
that not only enriches experiences but attracts others, some as visitors but 
many to stay.” 

— TonyCarvajal 

Executive Vice President 
Florida Chamber Foundation 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


7 



Economic Impact of Spending 
by Nonprofit Arts and Cultural AUDIENCES 
in the State of Florida 


The nonprofit arts and culture industry, unlike most industries, leverages a significant amount of event- 
related spending by its audiences. For example, when patrons attend a cultural event, they may pay to park 
their car, purchase dinner at a restaurant, shop in nearby stores, eat dessert after the show, and pay a 
babysitter upon their return home. Attendees from out of town often spend the night in a hotel. This 
spending generates related commerce for local businesses such as restaurants, parking garages, retail 
stores, and hotels. Local businesses that cater to arts and culture audiences reap the rewards of this 
economic activity. 

To measure the impact of spending by cultural audiences in the State of Florida, data were collected from 
35,967 event attendees during 2016. Researchers used an audience-intercept methodology, a standard 
technique in which patrons are asked to complete a short survey about their event-related spending (while 
they are attending the event). Event-related spending by these attendees totaled $2.39 billion in the 
State of Florida during fiscal year 2015, excluding the cost of event admission. The following table 
demonstrates the total economic impact of this spending. 


TABLE 3: 

Total Economic Impact of Spending by Nonprofit Arts and Cultural AUDIENCES 
in the State of Florida (excluding the cost of event admission 1 ) 


State of Florida 

Median of Participating 
Statewide Study Regions 

Total Audience Expenditures 2 

$2,390,536,073 

$379,531,275 

Full-Time Equivalent Jobs 

60,258 

9,381 

Resident Household Income 

$1,380,983,000 

$232,723,500 

Local Government Revenue 

$113,865,000 

$15,332,000 

State Government Revenue 

$160,334,000 

$21,331,000 


1 Why exclude the cost of admission? The admissions paid by attendees are excluded from the audience analysis because 
those dollars are captured in the operating budgets of the participating nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and, in 
turn, are spent by the organizations. This methodology avoids “double-counting” those dollars in the study analysis. 

2 To calculate the total estimated audience expenditures in the State of Florida, first the audience expenditure findings for 
any individual participating study regions that are located within the State of Florida were summed. Next, the residency 
percentages and the average per person arts-related expenditure for residents and nonresidents were applied to any 
additional attendance data collected from organizations located within the State of Florida but outside of the individual 
participating study region(s). Finally, the results were added to the aggregate of the individual participating region(s). 
Therefore, the total audience expenditures for the State of Florida do not equal the average per person event-related 
expenditure for residents multiplied by the total estimated attendance by residents plus the average per person event- 
related expenditure for nonresidents multiplied by the total estimated attendance by nonresidents. 


8 


AMERICANS FOR TFIE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 



Cultural Tourists Spend More 


The 35,967 audience survey respondents were asked to provide the ZIP code of their primary residence, 
enabling researchers to determine which attendees were local residents (live within the State of Florida) 
and which were nonresidents (live outside the State of Florida). In the State of Florida, researchers estimate 
that 84.8 percent of the 70 million nonprofit arts attendees were residents; 15.2 percent were nonresidents. 

Nonresident attendees spent an average of 93 percent more per person than local attendees ($56.80 
vs. $29.37) as a result of their attendance to cultural events. As would be expected from a traveler, higher 
spending was typically found in the categories of lodging, meals, and transportation. When a community 
attracts cultural tourists, it harnesses significant economic rewards. 


TABLE 4: Event-Related Spending by Arts and Culture Event Attendees Totaled $2.39 billion 
in the State of Florida (excluding the cost of event admission) 


Residents 

Nonresidents 

All 

State of Florida 
Event Attendees 

Total Attendance 

59,357,570 

10,639,564 

69,997,134 

Percent of Attendees 

84.8% 

15.2% 

100% 

Average Dollars Spent Per Attendee 

$29.37 

$56.80 

$33.53 

Total Event-Related Expenditures 

$1,333,011,954 

$1,057,524,119 

$2,390,536,073 


TABLE 5: Nonprofit Arts and Culture Event Attendees Spend an Average of $33.53 Per Person 
in the State of Florida (excluding the cost of event admission) 


Residents 

Nonresidents 

All 

State of Florida 
Event Attendees 

Refreshments/Snacks During Event 

$5.21 

$4.83 

$5.15 

Meals Before/After Event 

$12.27 

$16.71 

$12.94 

Souvenirs and Gifts 

$3.54 

$5.31 

$3.81 

Clothing and Accessories 

$2.47 

$2.45 

$2.46 

Ground Transportation 

$3.01 

$6.67 

$3.56 

Event-Related Child Care 

$0.36 

$0.26 

$0.35 

Overnight Lodging (one night only) 

$2.16 

$19.37 

$4.77 

Other 

$0.35 

$1.20 

$0.48 

Total Per Person Spending 

$29.37 

$56.80 

$33.53 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


9 




The Arts Drive Tourism 


Each of the nonresident survey respondents (i.e., those who live outside the State of Florida) were asked 
about the purpose of their trip: 46.1 percent indicated that the primary purpose of their visit to the State 
of Florida was “specifically to attend this arts/cultural event.” This finding demonstrates the power of the 
arts to attract visitors to the community. 

The audience-intercept survey also asked nonresident attendees if they would have traveled somewhere 
else (instead of to the State of Florida) if the event where they were surveyed had not occurred: 42.2 
percent of nonresident attendees would have “traveled to a different community to attend a similar 
cultural event.” 

Of the 15.2 percent of arts attendees who are nonresidents, 18.5 percent reported an overnight lodging 
expense. Not surprisingly, nonresident attendees with overnight expenses spent considerably more money 
per person during their visit to the State of Florida than did nonresident attendees without overnight 
lodging expenses ($177.08 and $29.54, respectively). For this analysis, only one night of lodging expenses is 
counted toward the audience expenditure, regardless of how many nights these cultural tourists actually 
stayed in the community. This conservative approach ensures that the audience-spending figures are not 
inflated by non-arts-related spending. 

The Arts Retain Local Dollars 

The survey also asked local resident attendees about what they would have done if the arts event that they 
were attending was not taking place: 44.8 percent of resident attendees said they would have “traveled 
to a different community to attend a similar cultural event.” 

The cultural tourism findings on this page demonstrate the economic impact of the nonprofit arts and 
culture industry in its truest sense. If a community fails to provide a variety of artistic and cultural 
experiences, not only will it fail to attract new dollars from cultural tourists, it will also lose the discretionary 
spending of its own residents who will travel elsewhere for a similar experience. 

“Museums and other cultural organizations across Florida employ 

thousands of people, attract tourists to our cities and towns, and help 

establish a sense of identity in their local communities. Floridians benefit 

from a thriving arts and culture industry not only through the activities of 

these organizations, but also through the job growth, spending of patrons, 

and increased sales tax revenues that fuel our economy." 

Malinda J. Horton 

Executive Director 

Florida Association of Museums 


10 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 



Travel Party and Demographic Characteristics of Arts Attendees 


The tables below list the audience-intercept survey findings related to travel party size as well as the age, 
educational attainment, and household income reported by the survey respondents. 


TABLE 6: Travel Party and Demographic Characteristics of Arts Audiences in the State of Florida 


Residents 

Nonresidents 


Travel Party Size 

Average number of adults (18 years or older) 

2.3 

2.4 

Average number of children (younger than 18) 

0.3 

0.3 

Average travel party size 

2.6 

2.7 


Trip Characteristics 

Average number of nights spent away from home as a result of arts event 

0.1 

1.4 

Percentage with any nights spent away from home as a result of arts event 

5.3% 

39.6% 

Percentage attending the arts event or facility (where they were surveyed) for the first 
time 

28.6% 

57.5% 


Age of Cultural Attendees 

18-34 

15.1% 

11.1% 

35-44 

11.4% 

10.2% 

45-54 

13.7% 

11.9% 

55-64 

19.4% 

21.3% 

65 or Older 

40.4% 

45.5% 


Educational Attainment of Cultural Attendees 

Less than high school 

0.3% 

0.1% 

High school 

8.7% 

7.7% 

2-year college/technical/associates degree 

17.4% 

13.4% 

4-year college/bachelors degree 

35.6% 

32.2% 

Masters degree 

27.1% 

33.6% 

Doctoral degree 

11.0% 

13.1% 


Annual Household Income of Cultural Attendees 

Less than $40,000 

13.8% 

8.5% 

$40,000 to $59,999 

16.0% 

11.7% 

$60,000 to $79,999 

17.5% 

14.4% 

$80,000 to $99,999 

14.2% 

14.4% 

$100,000 to $119,999 

13.3% 

15.7% 

$120,000 or More 

25.2% 

35.3% 


Civic Engagement of Cultural Attendees 

Percentage that voted in 2016 U.S. presidential election 

90.0% 

83.5% 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


11 




“Mayors understand the connection between the arts industry and city 
revenues. Arts activity creates thousands of direct and indirect jobs 
and generates billions in government and business revenues. The arts 
also make our cities destinations for tourists, help attract and retain 
businesses, and play an important role in the economic revitalization of 
cities and the vibrancy of our neighborhoods.” 

— Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett 

President, The United States Conference of Mayors 


12 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 



Conclusion 


The nonprofit arts and culture sector is a $4.68 billion industry in the State of 
Florida— one that supports 132,366 full-time equivalent jobs and generates 
$492.3 million in local and state government revenue. 


Nonprofit arts and cultural organizations are businesses in their own right. They 
spent $2.29 billion during fical year 2015 to employ people locally, purchase 
goods and services from local establishments, and attract tourists. They also 
leveraged a remarkable $2.39 billion in additional spending by cultural 
audiences— spending that pumps vital revenue into restaurants, hotels, retail 
stores, parking garages, and other local businesses. 


This study puts to rest a misconception that communities support arts and 
culture at the expense of local economic development. In fact, communities that 
support the arts and culture are investing in an industry that supports jobs, 
generates government revenue, and is the cornerstone of tourism. This Arts & 
Economic Prosperity 5 study shows conclusively that the arts mean business in 
the State of Florida! 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS [ Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


13 


“A vital component to generating economic growth in our communities 
can be attributed to supporting and funding the arts. It is apparent 
that decreased support of the arts has negatively impacted some 
areas of our country. To compete and thrive in today's workforce 
environment it is apparent that supporting the arts helps foster a more 
creative and innovative workforce that strengthens our economy." 

— Nevada Assemblywoman Maggie Carlton 

Co-Chair, National Conference of State Legislatures 
Labor & Economic Development Committee 


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AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 



The Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 Calculator 

To make it easier to compare the economic impacts of different organizations within the State of Florida (or 
to calculate updated estimates in the immediate years ahead), the project researchers calculated the 
economic impact per $100,000 of direct spending by nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and their 
audiences. 

Economic Impact Per $100,000 of Direct Spending by ORGANIZATIONS 

For every $100,000 in direct spending by a nonprofit arts and cultural organization in the State of Florida, 
there was the following total economic impact. 


TABLE 7: 

Ratios of Economic Impact Per $100,000 of Direct Spending by Nonprofit Arts and Cultural Organizations 
in the State of Florida 


State of Florida 

Median of Participating 
Statewide Study Regions 

Full-Time Equivalent Jobs 

3.15 

3.43 

Resident Household Income 

$86,066 

$79,001 

Local Government Revenue 

$3,819 

$3,253 

State Government Revenue 

$5,724 

$5,182 


An Example of Mow to Use the Organizational Spending Calculator Table (above): 

An administrator from a nonprofit arts and cultural organization that has total expenditures of $250,000 
wants to determine the organization’s total economic impact on full-time equivalent (FTE) employment in 
the State of Florida. The administrator would: 

1. Determine the amount spent by the nonprofit arts and cultural organization; 

2. Divide the total expenditure by 100,000; and 

3. Multiply that figure by the FTE employment ratio per $100,000 for the State of Florida. 

Thus, $250,000 divided by 100,000 equals 2.5; 2.5 times 3.15 (from the top row of data on Table 1 above) 
equals a total of 7.9 full-time equivalent jobs supported (both directly and indirectly) within the State of 
Florida by that nonprofit arts and cultural organization. Using the same procedure, the estimate can be 
calculated for resident household income as well as for local and state government revenue. 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


15 



Economic Impact Per $100,000 of Direct Spending by AUDIENCES 


The economic impact of event-related spending by arts audiences can also be derived for an individual 
organization or groups of organizations in the State of Florida. 

The first step is to determine the total estimated event-related spending by attendees who are residents of 
the State of Florida. To derive this figure, first multiply the total attendance by the percentage of attendees 
that are residents. Then, multiply the result by the average per person event-related expenditure by 
resident attendees. The result is the total estimated event-related spending by resident attendees. 

The second step is to do the same for nonresidents of the State of Florida. To derive this figure, first multiply 
the total attendance by the percentage of attendees that are nonresidents. Then, multiply the result by the 
average per person event-related expenditure by nonresident attendees. The result is the total estimated 
event-related spending by nonresident attendees. 

Then, add the results from the first two steps together to calculate the total estimated event-related 
audience spending. Finally, the ratios of economic impact per $100,000 in direct spending can then be 
used to determine the total economic impact of the total estimated audience spending. 


TABLE 8: Audience Spending Patios for the Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 Calculator 
in the State of Florida (excluding the cost of event admission) 


Residents 

Nonresidents 

Percent of Attendees 

84.8% 

15.2% 

Average Per Person Event-Related Expenditures 

$29.37 

$56.80 


TABLE 9: 

Ratios of Economic Impact Per $100,000 of Direct Spending by Nonprofit Arts and Culture Audiences 
in the State of Florida 


State of Florida 

Median of Participating 
Statewide Study Regions 

Full-Time Equivalent Jobs 

2.52 

2.56 

Resident Household Income 

$57,769 

$57,944 

Local Government Revenue 

$4,763 

$4,387 

State Government Revenue 

$6,707 

$5,982 


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AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 



An Example of How to Use the Audience Spending Calculator Tables (on the preceding page): 

An administrator wants to determine the total economic impact of the 25,000 total attendees to his/her 
organization's nonprofit arts and cultural events on full-time equivalent (FTE) employment in the State of 
Florida. The administrator would: 

1. Multiply the total attendance by the percentage of attendees that are residents; 

2. Multiply the result of step 1 by the average per person event-related expenditure for residents; 

3. Multiply the total attendance by the percentage of attendees that are nonresidents; 

4. Multiply the result of step 3 by the average per person event-related expenditure for nonresidents; 

5. Sum the results of steps 2 and 4 to calculate the total estimated event-related audience spending; 

6. Divide the resulting total estimated audience spending by 100,000; and 

7. Multiply that figure by the FTE employment ratio per $100,000 for the State of Florida. 

Thus, 25,000 times 84.8% (from Table 8 on the preceding page) equals 21,200; 21,200 times $29.37 (from 
Table 8) equals $622,644; 25,000 times 15.2% (from Table 8) equals 3,800; 3,800 times $56.80 equals 
$215,840; $622,644 plus $215,840 equals $838,484, $838,484 divided by 100,000 equals 8.38; 8.38 
times 2.52 (from the top row of data on Table 9 on the preceding page) equals a total of 21.1 full-time 
equivalent jobs supported (both directly and indirectly) within the State of Florida by that nonprofit arts and 
cultural organization. Using the same procedure, the estimate can be calculated for resident household 
income as well as for local and state government revenue. 


Making Comparisons with Similar Study Regions 

For the purpose of this analysis and unique report, the geographic region being studied is defined as the 

State of Florida. According to the most recent data available from the U.S. Census Bureau, the population 
of the State of Florida was estimated to be 19,893,297 during 2015. For comparison purposes, 458 pages of 
detailed data tables containing the study results for all 341 participating study regions are located in 
Appendix B of the National Statistical Report. The data tables are stratified by population, making it easy to 
compare the findings for the State of Florida to the findings for similarly populated study regions (as well as 
any other participating study regions that are considered valid comparison cohorts). 

The National Summary Report and National Brochure are available both by download (free) and 
hardcopy (for purchase). The National Statistical Report (more than 500 pages in length) is available by 
download only. All documents and resources can be found at 
www.AmericansForTheArts.org/Economiclmpact. 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


17 


“The arts and culture industry is a critical piece in our state economy, 
with an economic impact of $4.68 billion. Additionally, the industry 
supports thousands of jobs for hard-working Florida taxpayers and 
mobilizes volunteers to donate time and money to ensure that the 
Sunshine State is a rich and vibrant state for arts and culture. 
Floridians should take pride in the state's growing arts and culture 
industry, not just due to its impact on the state economy but because it 
forges a unique identity that strictly applies to Florida.” 

— Dominic M. Calabro 
President and CEO 
Florida TaxWatch 


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AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 



About This Study 

This Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 study was conducted by Americans for the Arts to 
document the economic impact of the nonprofit arts and culture industry in 341 communities 
and regions (113 cities, 115 counties, 81 multi-city or multi-county regions, 20 states, and 12 
individual arts districts)— representing all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. 


The diverse local communities range in 
population (1,500 to four million) and type (rural 
to urban). The study focuses solely on nonprofit 
arts and cultural organizations and their 
audiences. The study excludes spending by 
individual artists and the for-profit arts and 
entertainment sector (e.g., Broadway or the 
motion picture industry). Detailed expenditure 
data were collected from 14,439 arts and culture 
organizations and 212,691 of their attendees. The 
project economists, from the Georgia Institute of 
Technology, customized input-output economic 
models for each participating study region to 
provide specific and reliable economic impact 
data about their nonprofit arts and culture 
industry: full-time equivalent jobs, household 
income, and local and state government revenue. 

The 250 Local, Regional, and 
Statewide Study Partners 

Americans for the Arts published a Call for 
Participants in 2015 seeking communities 
interested in participating in the Arts & Economic 
Prosperity 5 study. Of the more than 300 
potential partners that expressed interest, 250 
local, regional, and statewide organizations 
agreed to participate and complete four 
participation criteria: identify and code the 
universe of nonprofit arts and cultural 
organizations in their study region; assist 
researchers with the collection of detailed 
financial and attendance data from those 
organizations; conduct audience-intercept 
surveys at cultural events; and pay a modest cost- 
sharing fee (no community was refused 
participation for an inability to pay). Thirty of the 
250 partners included multiple study regions as 


part of their AEP5 participation (e.g., a county as 
well as a specific city located within the county). As 
a result, the 250 local, regional, and statewide 
organizations represent a total of 341 participating 
study regions. 

Citizens for Florida Arts responded to the 2015 
Call for Participants, and agreed to complete the 
required participation criteria. 

Surveys of Nonprofit Arts and 
Cultural ORGANIZATIONS 

Each of the 250 study partners identified the 
universe of nonprofit arts and cultural 
organizations that are located in their region(s) 
using the Urban Institute’s National Taxonomy of 
Exempt Entity (NTEE) coding system as a guideline. 
The NTEE system— developed by the National 
Center for Charitable Statistics at the Urban 
Institute— is a definitive classification system for 
nonprofit organizations recognized as tax exempt 
by the Internal Revenue Code. This system divides 
the entire universe of nonprofit organizations into 
10 Major categories, including “Arts, Culture, and 
Humanities.” The Urban Institute reports that 
approximately 100,000 nonprofit arts and 
cultural organizations were registered with the IRS 

in 2015. 

The following NTEE “Arts, Culture, and 
Humanities” subcategories were included in this 
study: 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS [ Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


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A01 - Alliances and Advocacy 

A02 - Management and Technical Assistance 

A03 - Professional Societies and Associations 

A05 - Research Institutes and Public Policy Analysis 

All - Single Organization Support 

A12 - Fund Raising and Fund Distribution 

A19 - Support (not elsewhere classified) 

A20 - Arts and Culture (general) 

A23 - Cultural and Ethnic Awareness 
A24 - Folk Arts 
A25 - Arts Education 

A26 - Arts and Humanities Councils and Agencies 

A27 - Community Celebrations 

A30 - Media and Communications (general) 

A31 - Film and Video 
A32 - Television 
A33 - Printing and Publishing 
A34 - Radio 

A40 - Visual Arts (general) 

A50 - Museums (general) 

A51 - Art Museums 
A52 - Children’s Museums 
A53 - Folk Arts Museums 
A54 - History Museums 

A56 - Natural History and Natural Science Museums 
A57 - Science and Technology Museums 
A60 - Performing Arts (general) 

A61 - Performing Arts Centers 

A62 - Dance 

A63 - Ballet 

A65 - Theatre 

A68 - Music 

A69 - Symphony Orchestras 
A6A - Opera 

A6B - Singing and Choral Groups 
A6C - Bands and Ensembles 
A6E - Performing Arts Schools 
A70 - Humanities (general) 

A80 - Historical Organizations (general) 

A82 - Historical Societies and Historic Preservation 
A84 - Commemorative Events 
A90 - Arts Services (general) 

A99 - Arts, Culture, and Humanities (miscellaneous) 


In addition to the organization types listed above, 
the study partners were encouraged to include 
other types of eligible organizations if they play a 
substantial role in the cultural life of the 
community or if their primary purpose is to 


promote participation in, appreciation for, and 
understanding of the visual, performing, folk, 
literary arts, and/or media arts. These include 
government-owned and government-operated 
cultural facilities and institutions, municipal arts 
agencies and councils, private community arts 
organizations, unincorporated arts groups, living 
collections (such as zoos, aquariums, and botanical 
gardens), university presenters and cultural 
facilities, and arts programs that are embedded 
under the umbrella of a nonarts organization or 
facility (such as a community center or church). In 
short, if it displays the characteristics of a nonprofit 
arts and cultural organization, it is included. With 
rare exception, for-profit businesses and individual 
artists are excluded from this study. 

To collect the required financial and attendance 
information from eligible organizations, 
researchers implemented a multipronged data 
collection process. 

Americans for the Arts partnered with DataArts to 
collect detailed budget and attendance 
information about each organization’s fiscal year 
that ended in 2015. DataArts’ Cultural Data Profile 
(CDP) is a unique system that enables arts and 
cultural organizations to enter financial, 
programmatic, and operational data into a 
standardized online form. To reduce the survey 
response burden on participating organizations, 
and because the CDP collects the detailed 
information required for this economic impact 
analysis, researchers used confidential CDP data 
as the primary organizational data collection 
mechanism for the Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 
study. This primary data collection effort was 
supplemented with an abbreviated one-page 
paper version of the survey that was administered 
to organizations that did not respond to the CDP 
survey. 

Nationally, information was collected from 14,439 
eligible organizations about their fiscal year 2015 


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AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


expenditures, event attendance, in-kind 
contributions, and volunteerism. Responding 
organizations had budgets ranging from $0 to 
$785 million (Smithsonian Institution). Response 
rates for the 341 communities ranged from 9.5 
percent to 100 percent and averaged 54.0 
percent. It is important to note that each study 
region’s results are based solely on the actual 
survey data collected. No estimates have been 
made to account for nonparticipating eligible 
organizations. Therefore, the less-than-100 
percent response rates suggest an 
understatement of the economic impact findings 
in most of the individual study regions. 

In the State of Florida, 1,688 of the 4,312 
eligible nonprofit arts and cultural 
organizations identified by Citizens for Florida 
Arts participated in this study— a participation 
rate of 39.1 percent 

Surveys of Nonprofit Arts and Cultural 
AUDIENCES 

Audience-intercept surveying, a common and 
accepted research method, was conducted in ail 
341 of the study regions to measure event-related 
spending by nonprofit arts and culture audiences. 
Patrons were asked to complete a short survey 
while attending an event. Nationally, a total of 
212,691 attendees completed a valid survey. The 
randomly selected respondents provided 
itemized expenditure data on attendance-related 
activities such as meals, retail shopping (e.g., gifts 
and souvenirs), local transportation, and lodging. 
Data were collected throughout 2016 (to account 
for seasonality) as well as at a broad range of 
both paid and free events (a night at the opera 
will typically yield more audience spending than a 
weekend children’s theater production or a free 
community music festival, for example). The 
survey respondents provided information about 
the entire party with whom they were attending 
the event. With an overall average travel party 
size of 2.56 people, these data actually represent 

AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


the spending patterns of more than 544,489 
cultural attendees. 

In the State of Florida, a total of 35,967 valid 
audience-intercept surveys were collected from 
attendees to arts and cultural performances, 
events, and exhibits during 2016. 

Economic Analysis 

A common theory of community growth is that an 
area must export goods and services if it is to 
prosper economically. This theory is called 
economic-base theory, and it depends on dividing 
the economy into two sectors: the export sector 
and the local sector. Exporters, such as automobile 
manufacturers, hotels, and department stores, 
obtain income from customers outside of the 
community. This “export income” then enters the 
local economy in the form of salaries, purchases of 
materials, dividends, and so forth, and becomes 
income to residents. Much of it is respent locally; 
some, however, is spent for goods imported from 
outside of the community. The dollars respent 
locally have an economic impact as they continue 
to circulate through the local economy. This theory 
applies to arts organizations as well as to other 
producers. 

Studying Economic Impact Using Input- 
Output Analysis 

To derive the most reliable economic impact data, 
input-output analysis is used to measure the impact 
of expenditures by nonprofit arts and cultural 
organizations and their audiences. This is a highly- 
regarded type of economic analysis that has been 
the basis for two Nobel Prizes. The models are 
systems of mathematical equations that combine 
statistical methods and economic theory in an area 
of study called econometrics. They trace how many 
times a dollar is respent within the local economy 
before it leaks out, and it quantifies the economic 
impact of each round of spending. This form of 
economic analysis is well suited for this study 


21 


because it can be customized specifically to each 
study region. 

To complete the analysis for the State of 
Florida, project economists customized an 
input-output model based on the local dollar 
flow among 533 finely detailed industries within 
the unique economy of All Florida counties. This 
was accomplished by using detailed data on 
employment, incomes, and government revenues 
provided by the U.S. Department of Commerce 
(County Business Patterns, the Regional 
Economic Information System, and the Survey of 
State and Local Finance), local tax data (sales 
taxes, property taxes, and miscellaneous local 
option taxes), as well as the survey data from the 
responding nonprofit arts and cultural 
organizations and their audiences. 

The Input-Output Process 

The input-output model is based on a table of 
533 finely detailed industries showing local sales 
and purchases. The local and state economy of 
each community is researched so the table can 
be customized for each community. The basic 
purchase patterns for local industries are derived 
from a similar table for the U.S. economy for 2012 
(the latest detailed data available from the U.S. 
Department of Commerce). The table is first 
reduced to reflect the unique size and industry 
mix of the local economy, based on data from 
County Business Patterns and the Regional 
Economic Information System of the U.S. 
Department of Commerce. It is then adjusted so 
that only transactions with local businesses are 
recorded in the inter-industry part of the table. 
This technique compares supply and demand and 
estimates the additional imports or exports 
required to make total supply equal total 
demand. The resulting table shows the detailed 
sales and purchase patterns of the local 
industries. The 533-industry table is then 
aggregated to reflect the general activities of 32 


industries plus local households, creating a total of 
33 industries. To trace changes in the economy, 
each column is converted to show the direct 
requirements per dollar of gross output for each 
sector. This direct-requirements table represents 
the “recipe” for producing the output of each 
industry. 

The economic impact figures for Arts & Economic 
Prosperity 5 were computed using what is called an 
“iterative” procedure. This process uses the sum of 
a power series to approximate the solution to the 
economic model. This is what the process looks like 
in matrix algebra: 

T = IX + AX + A 2 X + A 3 X + ... + A"X. 

T is the solution, a column vector of changes in 
each industry’s outputs caused by the changes 
represented in the column vector X. A is the 33 by 
33 direct-requirements matrix. This equation is 
used to trace the direct expenditures attributable 
to nonprofit arts organizations and their audiences. 
A multiplier effect table is produced that displays 
the results of this equation. The total column is T. 
The initial expenditure to be traced is IX (I is the 
identity matrix, which is operationally equivalent to 
the number 1 in ordinary algebra). Round 1 is AX, 
the result of multiplying the matrix A by the vector 
X (the outputs required of each supplier to produce 
the goods and services purchased in the initial 
change under study). Round 2 is A2X, which is the 
result of multiplying the matrix A by Round 1 (it 
answers the same question applied to Round 1: 
“What are the outputs required of each supplier to 
produce the goods and services purchased in 
Round 1 of this chain of events?”). Each of columns 
1 through 12 in the multiplier effects table 
represents one of the elements in the continuing 
but diminishing chain of expenditures on the right 
side of the equation. Their sum, T, represents the 
total production required in the local economy in 
response to arts activities. 


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AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


Calculation of the total impact of the nonprofit 
arts on the outputs of other industries (T) can 
now be converted to impacts on the final incomes 
to residents by multiplying the outputs produced 
by the ratios of household income to output and 
employment to output. Thus, the employment 
impact of changes in outputs due to arts 
expenditures is calculated by multiplying 
elements in the column of total outputs by the 
ratio of employment to output for the 32 
industries in the region. Changes in household 
incomes, local government revenues, and state 
government revenues due to nonprofit arts 
expenditures are similarly transformed. The same 
process is also used to show the direct impact on 
incomes and revenues associated with the 
column of direct local expenditures. 

A comprehensive description of the methodology 
used to complete the national study is available at 
www.AmericansForTheArts.org/Economiclmpact. 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


23 


“People come from all over the world to experience Florida's diverse 
attractions, including our vibrant arts and culture scene, which keeps 
them coming back for more. Arts and cultural tourism is the lifeblood 
of many Florida communities, and an important part of our state's 
story. Our arts and culture offerings draw visitors who shop at local 
businesses, stay in hotels and eat at local restaurants, which supports 
jobs, grows our economy, and helps make Florida the global 
destination that it is.” 

— Ken Lawson 

President and CEO 
Visit Florid a 


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AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 



Frequently Used Terms 

Cultural Tourism 

Travel directed toward experiencing the arts, heritage, and special character of a place. 

Direct Economic Impact 

A measure of the economic effect of the initial expenditure within a community. For example, when the 
symphony pays its players, each musician’s salary, the associated government taxes, and full-time equivalent 
employment status represent the direct economic impact. 

Direct Expenditures 

The first round of expenditures in the economic cycle. A paycheck from the symphony to the violin player 
and a ballet company’s purchase of dance shoes are examples of direct expenditures. 

Econometrics 

The process of using statistical methods and economic theory to develop a system of mathematical 
equations that measures the flow of dollars between local industries. The input-output model developed for 
this study is an example of an econometric model. 

Econometrician 

An economist who designs, builds, and maintains econometric models. 

Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Jobs 

A term that describes the total amount of labor employed. Economists measure FTE jobs— not the total 
number of employees— because it is a more accurate measure of total employment. It is a manager’s 
discretion to hire one full-time employee, two half-time employees, four quarter-time employees, etc. Almost 
always, more people are affected than are reflected in the number of FTE jobs reported due to the 
abundance of part-time employment, especially in the nonprofit arts and culture industry. 

Indirect and Induced Economic Impact 

This study measures the economic impact of the arts using a methodology that enables economists to track 
how many times a dollar is respent within the local economy, and thus to measure the economic impact 
generated by each round of spending. When a theater company purchases paint from the local hardware 
store, there is a measurable economic effect of that initial expenditure within a community. However, the 
economic benefits typically do not end there, because the hardware store uses some of its income to pay 
the clerk that sold the paint, as well as to pay its electric bill and to re-stock the shelves. The indirect and 
induced economic impacts are the effects of the subsequent rounds of spending by businesses and 
individuals, respectively. (See the example on Page 5 of this report.) 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


25 


Input-Output Analysis 

A system of mathematical equations that combines statistical methods and economic theory in an area of 
economic study called econometrics. Economists use this model (occasionally called an interindustry model) 
to measure how many times a dollar is respent in, or “ripples” through, a community before it “leaks out” of 
the local economy by being spent non-iocaliy (see Leakage below). The model is based on a matrix that 
tracks the dollar flow among 533 finely detailed industries in each community. It allows researchers to 
determine the economic impact of local spending by nonprofit arts and cultural organizations on jobs, 
household income, and government revenue. 

Leakage 

The money that community members spend outside of the local economy. This non-local spending has no 
economic impact within the community. A ballet company purchasing shoes from a non-local manufacturer 
is an example of leakage. If the shoe company were local, the expenditure would remain within the 
community and create another round of spending by the shoe company. 

Multiplier (often called Economic Activity Multiplier) 

An estimate of the number of times that a dollar changes hands within the community before it leaks out of 
the community (for example, the theater pays the actor, the actor spends money at the grocery store, the 
grocery store pays its cashier, and so on). This estimate is quantified as one number by which all 
expenditures are multiplied. For example, if the arts are a $10 million industry and a multiplier of three is 
used, then it is estimated that these arts organizations have a total economic impact of $30 million. The 
convenience of a multiplier is that it is one simple number; its shortcoming, however, is its reliability. Users 
rarely note that the multiplier is developed by making gross estimates of the industries within the local 
economy with no allowance for differences in the characteristics of those industries, usually resulting in an 
overestimation of the economic impact. In contrast, the input-output model employed in Arts & Economic 
Prosperity 5 is a type of economic analysis tailored specifically to each community and, as such, provides 
more reliable and specific economic impact results. 

Resident Household Income (often called Personal Income) 

The salaries, wages, and entrepreneurial income residents earn and use to pay for food, mortgages, and 
other living expenses. It is important to note that resident household income is not just salary. When a 
business receives money, for example, the owner usually takes a percentage of the profit, resulting in 
income for the owner. 

Revenue to Local and State Government 

Local and state government revenue is not derived exclusively from income, property, sales, and other 
taxes. It also includes license fees, utility fees, user fees, and filing fees. Local government revenue includes 
funds to city and county government, schools, and special districts. 


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AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


Frequently Asked Questions 

Mow were the 341 participating communities and regions selected? 

In 2015, Americans for the Arts published a Call for Participants for communities interested in participating 
in the Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 study. Of the more than 300 participants that expressed interest, 250 
agreed to participate and complete four participation criteria: (1) identify and code the universe of nonprofit 
arts and cultural organizations in their study region; (2) assist researchers with the collection of detailed 
financial and attendance data from those organizations; (3) conduct audience-intercept surveys at cultural 
events; and (4) pay a modest cost-sharing fee (no community was refused participation for an inability to 
pay). Thirty of the 250 partners included multiple regions as part of their participation (e.g., a county as well 
as a city located within the county); as a result, the 250 local, regional, and statewide partners represent a 
total of 341 participating study regions. 

Mow were the eligible nonprofit arts organizations in each community selected? 

Local partners attempted to identify their universe of nonprofit arts and cultural organizations using the 
Urban Institute’s National Taxonomy of Exempt Entity (NTEE) codes as a guideline. Eligible organizations 
included those whose primary purpose is to promote appreciation for and understanding of the visual, 
performing, folk, and media arts. Government-owned and government-operated cultural facilities and 
institutions, municipal arts agencies and councils, private community arts organizations, unincorporated arts 
groups, living collections (such as zoos, aquariums, and botanical gardens), university presenters and 
cultural facilities, and arts programs that are embedded under the umbrella of a non-arts organization or 
facility (such as a hospital or church) also were included if they play a substantial role in the cultural life of 
the community. For-profit businesses and individual artists are excluded from this study. 

What type of economic analysis was done to determine the study results? 

An input-output economic analysis was customized for each of the participating study regions to determine 
the economic impact its nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and arts audiences. Americans for the 
Arts, which conducted the research, worked with highly regarded economists to design the input-output 
models. 

What other information was collected in addition to the arts surveys? 

In addition to detailed expenditure data provided by the surveyed organizations and cultural attendees, 
researchers and economists collected extensive wage, labor, tax, and commerce data provided by the U.S. 
Department of Commerce (County Business Patterns, the Regional Economic Information System, and the 
Survey of State and Local Finance), as well as local and state tax data for use in the input-output analyses. 

Why doesn’t this study use a multiplier? 

When many people hear about an economic impact study, they expect the result to be quantified in what is 
often called a multiplier or an economic activity multiplier. The economic activity multiplier is an estimate of 
the number of times a dollar changes hands within the community (e.g., a theater pays its actor, the actor 
spends money at the grocery store, the grocery store pays the cashier, and so on). It is quantified as one 
number by which expenditures are multiplied. The convenience of the multiplier is that it is one simple 
number. Users rarely note, however, that the multiplier is developed by making gross estimates of the 
industries within the local economy and does not allow for differences in the characteristics of those 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


27 


industries. Using an economic activity multiplier usually results in an overestimation of the economic impact 
and therefore lacks reliability. 

Why are the admissions expenses excluded from the analysis of audience spending? 

Researchers assume that any admissions dollars paid by event attendees are typically collected as revenue 
for the organization that is presenting the event. The organization then spends those dollars. The 
admissions paid by audiences are excluded because those dollars are captured in the operating budgets of 
the participating nonprofit arts and cultural organizations. This methodology avoids “double-counting” 
those dollars in the analysis. 

Mow is the economic impact of arts and culture organizations different from other 
industries? 

Any time money changes hands there is a measurable economic impact. Social service organizations, 
libraries, and all entities that spend money have an economic impact. What makes the economic impact of 
arts and culture organizations unique is that, unlike most other industries, they induce large amounts of 
related spending by their audiences. For example, when patrons attend a performing arts event, they may 
purchase dinner at a restaurant, eat dessert after the show, and return home and pay the baby-sitter. These 
expenditures have a positive and measurable impact on the economy. 

Will my local legislators believe these results? 

Yes, this study makes a strong argument to legislators, but you may need to provide them with some extra 
help. It will be up to the user of this report to educate the public about economic impact studies in general 
and the results of this study in particular. The user may need to explain (1) the study methodology used; (2) 
that economists created an input-output model for each community and region in the study; and (3) the 
difference between input-output analysis and a multiplier. The good news is that as the number of economic 
impact studies completed by arts organizations and other special interest areas increases, so does the 
sophistication of community leaders whose influence these studies are meant to affect. Today, most decision 
makers want to know what methodology is being used and how and where the data were gathered. 

You can be confident that the input-output analysis used in this study is a highly-regarded model in the field 
of economics (the basis of two Nobel Prizes in economics). However, as in any professional field, there is 
disagreement about procedures, jargon, and the best way to determine results. Ask 12 artists to define art 
and you may get 12 answers; expect the same of economists. You may meet an economist who believes that 
these studies should be done differently (for example, a cost-benefit analysis of the arts). 

Mow can a community not participating in the Arts and Economic Prosperity 5 study apply 
these results? 

Because of the variety of communities studied and the rigor with which the Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 
study was conducted, nonprofit arts and cultural organizations located in communities that were not part of 
the study can estimate their local economic impact. Estimates can be derived by using the Arts & Economic 
Prosperity 5 Calculator (found at www.AmericansForTheArts.org/Economiclmpact). Additionally, users will 
find sample PowerPoint presentations, press releases, Op-Ed, and other strategies for proper application of 
their estimated economic impact data. 


28 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


Acknowledgments 

Americans for the Arts expresses its gratitude to the many people and organizations who 
made Arts & Economic Prosperity 5: The Economic Impact of Nonprofit Arts and Cultural 
Organizations and Their Audiences in the State of Florida possible and assisted in its 
development, coordination, and production. A study of this size cannot be completed without 
the collaboration of many partnering organizations. 


Generous funding for this project was provided by Citizens for Florida Arts, Inc., which also 
served as the local project partner and as such was responsible for the local implentation and 
data collection requirements of this customized analysis for the State of Florida. 


Special thanks to the John D. and Catherine T. 
MacArthur Foundation, the Barr Foundation, and 
The Ruth Lilly Fund of Americans for the Arts for 
their financial support of the national 
implementation of Arts & Economic Prosperity 5. 

Finally, each of our 250 local, regional, and 
statewide research partners contributed time 
and/or financial support toward the completion 
of this national study. We thank each and every 
one of them for committing the time and 
resources necessary to achieve success. A study 
of this magnitude is a total organizational effort; 
appreciation is extended to the entire board and 
staff of Americans for the Arts. The research 
department responsible for producing this study 
includes Randy Cohen, Ben Davidson, Isaac 
Fitzsimons, and Graciela Kahn. 


The State of Florida’s Participating 
Nonprofit Arts and Cultural 
Organizations 

This study could not have been completed 
without the cooperation of the 1,688 nonprofit 
arts and cultural organizations in the State of 
Florida, listed below, that provided detailed 
financial and event attendance information about 
their organization. 

4Ward Miami for Gay8 Festival; 621 Gallery; 7eventh Day Media; 
96.7 FM - Music Tampa Bay; A Classic Theatre Inc; A Gift for 
Teaching; A Greener Miami; Aaron I. Fleischman and Lin 
Lougheed Foundation; Academia de las Luminarias de las Bellas 
Artes; Academic, Cultural & Charitable Exchanges Corp.; 
Academy Of Ballet Arts; Academy Of Music And Art; Acoustic 
Music Society Of Southwest Florida (Aka Palmgrass); Acting for 
All; Actors' Playhouse Productions; Actors' Warehouse; Admit 
Program; Adrienne Arsht Center Foundation; African American 
Heritage Museum; African American Heritage Society; African 
American Museum Of The Arts; African Caribbean Dance 
Theatre; African Museum Of Arts And Culture; Aia Tampa Bay & 
Tampa Bay Foundation For Architecture And Design; AIGA 
(Professional Association for Design); AIMM Higher; Al Downing 
Tampa Bay Jazz Assoc.; Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture 
Garden; Alexander Foundation Formless Heart Fellowship for 
Discover Life Force Folkloric Dance Festival; Alexander W. 
Dreyfoos Sch. of the Arts-Meyer Hall; Algo Nuevo; Alhambra 
Music; All Florida Youth Orchestra (Broward County activities); 
All Florida Youth Orchestra (Miami-Dade); Alliance For Musical 
Arts Productions; Aluna Art Foundation; Alyans Atizay Ayisyen; 
Amaranthine; Amelia Island Chamber Music Festival; American 
Children's Orchestras For Peace; American Foundation for the 
Arts; American Institute of Polish Culture; American Stage; 
American Theater Festival Foundations; Amplifyme; Anaphiel 
Foundation; Anchor Arts Management; Ancient & Accepted 
Scottish Rite of Free Masonry Southern Jurisdiction for Miami 
Scottish Rite Temple; Ancient Spanish Monastery Foundation; 
Angel Fraser-Logan Dance Company; Anhinga Press; Anita S. 
Wooten Gallery (Valencia College); Ann Norton Sculpture 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


29 


Gardens; Anna Maria Artists Guild; Anna Maria Island Art 
League; Anna Maria Island Community Center; Anna Maria 
Island Concert Chorus & Orchestra; Anna Maria Island Historical 
Society Museum; Anna Maria Island Preservation Trust; Anti- 
heroes Project; Apalachee Press; Appleton Museum Of Art; April 
Is For Authors; AQUA Art Miami; Aqua Foundation for Women 
for Aqua Girl; Area Images; Area Performance Gallery Dba Area 
Stage Company; Armory Art Center; Ars Flores Symphony 
Orchestra; Art Basel Miami Beach; Art Center Sarasota; Art 
Council of SWFL; Art Creates US dba ProjectArt; Art Deco 
Society Of The Palm Beaches; Art Festival In The Pines; Art 
Gallery 21; Art Heart Foundation; Art in the Sky; Art League Of 
Daytona Beach; Art League Of Marco Island D/B/ A/Marco 
Island Center For The Arts; Art Miami, Contemporary Art Fair; 

Art Museum for Private Collections of the Americas; Art of 
Cultural Evolution for Colony 1; Art Works of Eau Gallie; Art 
Wynwood; ArtCenter Manatee; Artefactus Cultural Project; 

Artel; Artfest Fort Myers; ArtHaus Foundation; Artis— Naples; 
Artist Series Concerts of Sarasota; Artist Series Of Tallahassee; 
Artists Environmental Foundation of the Florida Keys; Artists For 
A Cause; Artists' Guild of Anna Maria Island; Artists Guild of 
Manatee; Artists in Bloom Festival; Artists In Residence In 
Everglades; Artists Showcase of the Palms Beaches; Artists' 
Workshop of New Smyrna Beach; Artmonia; ArtReach Orlando; 
Arts & Business Council Of Miami; Arts And Culture Alliance Of 
Sarasota County; Arts and Humanities Council of Charlotte 
County; Arts Association of Alachua County; Arts at St. Johns; 
Arts Ballet Theatre of Florida (Broward County activities); Arts 
Ballet Theatre Of Florida (Miami-Dade activities); Arts Business 
Institute; Arts Center Association; Arts Conservatory For Teens; 
Arts Council Of Hillsborough County; Arts Council Of Martin 
County; Arts Council of Plant City; Arts Council Of Volusia 
County; Arts Dance Generation; Arts For Act Gallery; Arts For 
Learning/Miami; Arts Foundation For Martin County; Arts in 
Healthcare Program (Lee Health); Arts Naples World Festival; 
Artserve; Artsouth, A Not For Profit Corporation; ArtSpring; Artz 
4 Life Academy; Artz-N-The-Hood; Asia Trend; Asian Coalition of 
Tallahassee; Asian Cultural Association of Central Florida; Asolo 
Repertory Theatre Company; Association of Indians in America; 
Association Of Performing Arts Of India; Association to Preserve 
African American Society, History and Tradition (PAST); 
Association to Preserve the Eatonville Community; Atlantic 
Center For The Arts; Atma Yoga Dance Company; Audubon of 
Martin County; Audubon of the Western Everglades; Avenida de 
Colores; Aventura Arts & Cultural Center; Ayuda For Cultural 
Arts Classes, Events And Programs; B.R.A.G./Henegar Center 
For The Arts; Bach Ensemble; Bach Festival Society of Winter 
Park; Bahama Village Music Project; Bakehouse Art Complex; 
Ballet Etudes Of South Florida; Ballet Flamenco La Rosa; Ballet 
Pensacola; Ballet Vero Beach Inc; Bands on the Beach; 
Barbershop Harmony Society; Barn Theatre; Barnacle Society; 
Barry University for Broad Performing Arts Center & The Pelican 
Theater; Barry University for Fiddler on the Roof; Barry University 
for Summer Science Research Program; Bartow Art Guild; Bas 
Fisher Invitational; Bascomb Memorial Broadcasting Foundation; 
Bay of Pigs Museum & Library of the 2506 Brigade; Bay Street 
Players; Bayfront Park Management Trust Corporation For 
Special Events And Programming, Festivals And Cultural 
Facilities; Bayshore Cultural And Performing Arts Center Inc Dba 
Capa Cultural And Performing Arts Center; Beaches Fine Arts 
Series Inc; Beaux Arts of the Lowe Art Museum if the University of 
Miami; Belcanto Singers; Belle Canto; Bengali Association Of 
South Florida; Bengali Society of Florida; Benzaiten Center for 
the Creative Arts; Beyond Us; Big Arts; Big Blue & You; Big 
Cypress Chapter National Society Of The Daughters Of The 
American Revolution (Big Cypress Chapter); Bilingual School of 
Business and Performing Arts; Bill Cosford Cinema; Bill Edwards 
Foundation for the Arts (Mahaffey Theater); Bistoury; Bits 'N 
Pieces Puppet Theatre; Black Archives History & Research 
Foundation Of South FL; Black Creek Bowl Association Of 
Middleburg Inc; Blue Grey Army; Bluebird Educational 
Foundation; Bob Carter's Actors Workshop & Repertory 
Company; Bob Rauschenberg Gallery at FSW; Boca Ballet 
Theatre Company; Boca Raton Children's Museum; Boca Raton 
Historical Society; Boca Raton Museum of Art; Boca Raton 

30 


Philharmonic Symphonia; Body & Soul Dance Theatre; Bok Tower 
Gardens; Bonnet House Museum & Gardens; Borscht 
Corporation; Bostwick Preservation; Boynton Cultural Center; 
Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County; Boys Choir of 
Tallahassee; Branches; Brandon Ballet; Bravo Center for the 
Arts; Brazilian Voices; Brazz Dance Theater Dba Augusto 
Soledade Brazzdance; Brevard Cultural Alliance; Brevard 
Symphony Orchestra; Brickell Avenue Literary Society; Britto 
Foundation; Broward Art Guild; Broward Center For The 
Performing Arts; Broward College; Broward County Cultural 
Division; Broward County Film Society; Broward County Libraries; 
Broward County Parks and Recreation; Broward Folk Club; 
Broward Public Schools; Broward Stage Door Theater; Business 
Improvement District of Coral Gables for Cultural and Special 
Events; Buskerfest Miami; CACEC; Cade Museum Foundation; 
Caladium Arts And Crafts Cooperative Inc; Calavida Inc; 
Cannonball Miami; Cape Coral Art League; Caribbean American 
Association of Lake County; Caribbean American Heritage 
Florida; Caribbean American Passport Foundation; Caribe Arts 
Fest at Little Haiti Cultural Center; Carrollwood Players; Casa de 
Mexico; Casa Feliz; Cascades Park Ampitheatre; Cathedral Arts 
Project; ce n'est pas nous; Celebration Foundation; Center for 
Contemporary Dance; Center for Emerging Art; Center For Fine 
Arts Education; Center for the Advancement of Jewish 
Education; Center for the Arts of Bonita Springs; Center One 
Foundation; Center Place Fine Arts And Civic Association; 
Central Florida Ballet Inc; Central Florida Community Arts; 
Central Florida Museum Of Arts And Sciences; Central Florida 
Vocal Arts; Central Florida Watercolor Society; Central Florida 
Zoo and Botanical Gardens; Centre For Women; Centro 
Asturiano; Centro Cultural Boliviano Masis Corp.; Centro 
Cultural Brasil-USA de Florida; Centro Cultural Espanol De 
Cooperacion Iberoamericana; Centro Cultural Puertorriqueno; 
Ceramic League of Miami; Challenger Learning Center; 

Chamber Music Society of Palm Beach; Chameleon Musicians; 
Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art; Charlotte 
County Art Guild (dba Visual Arts Center); Charlotte Symphony 
Orchestra Inc; Child of This Culture Foundation; Children's 
Gallery and Arts Center; Children's Museum Of The Treasure 
Coast; Children's Voice Chorus; Chinese Cultural Association 
(Miami-Dade activities); Chinese Cultural Foundation; Chopin 
Foundation Of The United States; Choral Arts Society Inc; Choral 
Society of Pensacola; Chump Change Promotions; Cl Foundation 
for South Beach Seafood Festival; Cinematique Of Daytona 
Beach; Circus Arts Conservatory; Cisneros Fontanals Art 
Foundation; Citizens for Florida Arts; Citrus Hall Of Fame Of 
Florida Inc; Citrus Youth Educational Symphonic Orchestra Inc; 
City Of Doral Parks And Recreation Department For Special 
Events, Cultural Activities, Festivals And Public Arts Program; 

City of Aventura Community Services Department for Cultural 
Programs, Special Events and Community Celebrations; City Of 
Coral Gables; City of Coral Gables Economic & Cultural 
Development Department; City of Coral Gables Historical 
Resources & Cultural Affairs Department; City of Doral for 
Legacy Park Community and Cultural Center; City of Fort 
Lauderdale (Community Redevelopment Agency NW Progresso 
Flagler Heights Area Fund); City of Fort Lauderdale (Parks & 
Recreation Department); City Of Gainesville; City of Hialeah 
Cultural Affairs; City of Hialeah for Garden of the Arts Capital 
Project and Amphitheater; City of Hialeah for Milander Center 
for Arts & Entertainment and Goodlet Theater; City of Hialeah 
Public Library; City Of Hollywood (Parks, Recreation, and 
Cultural Arts); City of Homestead for Seminole Theatre Capital 
Project Fund; City of Lauderhill; City Of Miami Beach 
Department Of Tourism, Culture And Economic Development & 
Art In Public Places Program; City of Miami Beach for Capital 
Improvements at Soundscape Park; City of Miami Beach for 
Miami Beach Convention Center; City of Miami Beach for the 
Bass Museum Operations and Interior Space Expansion; City of 
Miami Beach for The Byron Carlyle Theater; City of Miami Beach 
for The Colony Theater; City of Miami Beach for The Fillmore 
Miami Beach at The Jackie Gleason Theater; City of Miami for 
Capital Improvements in Museum Park; City of Miami for James 
L. Knight Center; City of Miami for Little Haiti Cultural Complex; 
City of Miami for Marine Stadium Flex Park Outdoor Event 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


Space; City of Miami for The Manuel Artime Cultural Center; City 
of Miami Gardens for the 11th Annual Jazz in the Gardens; City of 
Miami Office of Film and Entertainment; City of Miami Omni 
Community Redevelopment Agency for the Miami Entertainment 
Complex Capital Project; City Of Miramar; City of North Miami 
Beach for Cultural Programs, Community and Special Events; 

City Of North Miami Beach For Gwen Margolis Amphitheater; 
City of North Miami Beach for the City's 90th Anniversary 
Birthday Bash; City of North Miami Beach Public Library; City of 
North Miami Public Library; City Of Oakland Park; City Of Ocala 
Recreation And Parks & Ocala Municipal Arts Commission; City 
Of Pembroke Pines Recreation & Cultural Arts; City Of Pompano 
Beach Cultural Arts; City of Sunny Isles Beach for Gateway Park 
Performance Area; City of Sunny Isles Beach for the 9th Annual 
Sunny Isles Beach Jazz Fest; City of Tallahassee Parks & 
Recreation; City Of Tampa Art Programs Division; City Of Tampa 
Parks And Recreation Dept. Art Studios; City of Tampa's 
Creative Arts Theatre Company; City of West Miami for West 
Miami Cultural Festival; City Theatre (Broward activities); City 
Theatre (Miami activities); Civic Ballet of Volusia County; Civic 
Chorale of Greater Miami; Clarita Filgueiras - Flamenco Puro; 
Classic Chamber Concerts; Classical South Florida; Classical 
Virtuosi of Miami; Clearwater Arts Alliance; Clearwater Marine 
Aquarium; Clermont Downtown Partnership; Coalition of 
Hispanic Artists (CHA); Coconut Grove Arts & Historical 
Association; Coconut Grove Theater Foundation; Code 
Explorers; Coexistence Dba Embracing Our Differences; 
Collective Portal; College Of Central Florida - Visual And 
Performing Arts; College Park Neighborhood Arts and Theatre 
Center; Collier Child Care Resources (Lunch-Art-Auction); Collier 
County Agricultral Fair & Exposition; Collier County Public 
Schools Adult And Community Education; Colored Pencil Society 
Of America Dc 117- St Augustine; Commemorative Air Force; 
Communities in Schools of Miami for The Whole Village Theater 
& Arts Program; Community AIDS Resource dba Care Resource 
for White Party Week; Community Arts and Culture; Community 
Chorus Of Palm Coast Inc; Community Communications (90.7 
WMFE); Community Foundation For Ocala Marion County; 
Community Foundation of Broward; CommUNITY Gallery - 
Collier County Sheriff's Office; Community Performing Arts 
Association; Community Stepping Stones; Community Theatre of 
Miami Lakes dba Main Street Players; Compositum Musicae 
Novae; Concourse Council Inc; Conservancy of Southwest 
Florida; Contemporary Arts Foundation for The Rubell Family 
Collection; CONTEXT Art Miami; Copper Bridge Foundation; 

Cor Jesu Corp.; Coral Gables Art Cinema; Coral Gables 
Congregational Church (United Church Of Christ) For 2015- 
2016 Season Activities; Coral Gables Museum Corp; Coral 
Springs Center For The Arts; Coral Springs Chinese Cultural 
Association; Coral Springs Festival Of The Arts; Coral Springs 
Museum Of Art; Core Ensemble; Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 

Rollins College; Council of International Fashion Designers for 
Miami Fashion Week; Council On Culture & Arts+; Cove/Rincon, 
Corp.; Crealde Arts (DBA Crealde School Of Art); Creation Art 
Center; Creative City Collaborative Of Pompano Beach; 

Creative City Project; Creative Clay Cultural Arts Center; 
Creative Happiness Institute; Creative Pinellas; Creative 
Sanford; Crianca de Ouro Festival; Crowley Museum & Nature 
Center; Crystal Parrot Players; Cuatrogatos Foundation; Cuban 
American Phototheque Foundation; Cuban Classical Ballet Of 
Miami; Cuban Club Foundation; Cuban Cultural Heritage Corp.; 
Cuban Museum dba The American Museum of the Cuban 
Diaspora; Cuban Pilots Assoc./Air Museum of B-26 Aircraft; 
Cuban Soul Foundation; Cuban Theatre Folklore Heritage; 
Cultural Arts Coalition; Cultural Center At Ponte Vedra Beach; 
Cultural Connections Of Anna Maria Island; Cultural Council Of 
Greater Jacksonville; Cultural Council Of Indian River County; 
Cultural Council Of Palm Beach County; Cultural Development 
Group; Cultural Fusion; Cultural Park Theatre Company; Cultural 
Society of South Florida; Culture and Community Association; 
Curtain Call Playhouse; Curtiss Mansion; Cyprian Center for 
Expressive Arts; Dade Heritage Trust; Dali Museum; Dance Alive!; 
Dance Esaias Corporation; Dance Now! Ensemble; Dance Out 
Bullying; Dance/USA for 2015 Annual Convention in Miami; 
Dansconpany of Gainesville; DanzArte; Dave and Mary Alper 


Jewish Community Center; Davie School Foundation; Daytona 
Beach Choral Society; Daytona Beach Symphony Society; 
Daytona Playhouse; Debary Hall Historic Site; Deco Echo Artists' 
Delegation D/B/A Center For Folk And Community Art; Deering 
Estate Foundation; Deette Holden Cummer Museum Foundation 
Inc; Deland Fall Festival Of The Arts; DeLand Memorial Hospital 
Museum; Deland Museum Of Art; Delou Africa; Delray Beach 
Chorale; Delray Beach Downtown Marketing Cooperative; 

Delray Beach Playhouse; Delta Heritage Foundation; Design 
Miami; Developing Dreams Foundation; Developing Dreams 
Foundation For P.A.P - The Musical - Performing Arts Politics; 
Diaspora Arts Coalition; Diaspora Vibe Cultural Arts Incubator; 
Dien-B; Dimensions Dance Theater of Miami; Ding Darling 
Wildlife Society - Friends of the Refuge; Dinggin; DINGGIN for 
Summer Musical in Miami-Dade; Discovery Center (Ocala); Diva 
Arts & Entertainment; Divali Nagar; Dixie Theatre Foundation; 
Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center at Palm Beach State College; 
Downtown Arts District/CityArts Factory; Dr. Carter G. Woodson 
African American Museum; Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parade & 
Festivities Committee; Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts; 
Duck in the Truck Puppets; DuMond Conservancy for Primates 
and Tropical Forests; Duncan Mcclellan Gallery; Dunedin Fine Art 
Center; Dutton House; East Hillsborough Historical Society Inc; 
Ebony Chorale of the Palm Beaches; E-Comb for the 4th Miami & 
The Beaches Environmental Film Festival; Edge Zones; Edison 
and Ford Winter Estates; Edison Festival of Light; Educational 
Gallery Group; Eight Oclock Theatre; El Ingenio; Elizabeth Morse 
Genius Foundation; Elliott Museum / The House Of Refuge; 
Emerald Coast Science Center Inc; Emerald Coast Theatre 
Company; Emerson Center; Emit; Encounters in Excellence for 
Odyssey Earth; Enfamilia; Englewood Art Center; Enterprise 
Preservation Society; Entertainment Industry Incubator; Enzian; 
Everglades Foundation for Everglades Literacy Program; 
Everglades Outpost; Everglades Society For Historical 
Preservation; Evergreen Cemetery Association of Gainesville; 
Expanding and Preserving Our Cultural Heritage; Experience 
Aviation; Explorations V Children's Museum; Exponica 
International for La Feria de las Americas; Facundo Rivero 
Performing Arts; Faena Arts; Fairchild Palms Corp.; Fairchild 
Tropical Botanic Garden; FAMU Essential Theatre; Fantashique 
Apprentice Dance Company; Fantasy Theatre Factory (Broward 
County activities); Fantasy Theatre Factory (Miami activities); Fat 
Village Arts District; Fat Village Center for The Arts; FAU 
Dorothy F. Schmidt College Of Arts And Letters; FBZ Archivos 
Foundation; Federation of Families, Miami-Dade Chapter for 
Youth and the Art of Altered Books & Mandalas; Festival Of The 
Arts Committee Inc; Fiesta of Five Flags; Fifty Over Fifty dba 
Funding Arts Network (FAN); Film Florida; FilmGate Interactive; 
Fine Arts For Ocala; Fine Arts Society of Sarasota; Finger Lakes 
GrassRoots Festival Organization for Virginia Key GrassRoots 
Festival; Fire Haus Projects; Firehouse Cultural Center; First 
Baptist Church Of Naples (Naples Christmas Spectacular); First 
City Art Center; First Coast Opera Inc; First Night St. Petersburg; 
Flagler Beach Historical Museum; Flagler County Historical 
Society; Flagler Playhouse; Flamingo Gardens; Flipside Kings; 
Florene Litthcut Inner City Children's Touring Dance Company; 
Florida Air Museum at Sun n' Fun Expo Center; Florida Alliance 
for Arts Education; Florida Aquarium; Florida Art Education 
Association; Florida Arts / Sidney & Berne Davis Arts Center; 
Florida Association of Museums; Florida Association of Museums 
Foundation; Florida Blue Key (Homecoming Parade); Florida 
Chamber Orchestra Company; Florida Craftsmen (dba Florida 
CraftArt); Florida Dance Association; Florida Dance Education 
Organization; Florida Dance Theatre; Florida Day of the Dead; 
Florida Division Of Cultural Affairs; Florida Film Institute; Florida 
Governor's Mansion Foundation; Florida Grand Opera (Broward 
County activities); Florida Grand Opera (Miami-Dade activities); 
Florida Guitar Foundation; Florida Gulf Coast University Art 
Gallery; Florida Historic Capitol Museum Foundation; Florida 
Holocaust Museum; Florida Humanities Council; Florida 
International University College of Architecture and the Arts for 
Inspicio; Florida International University College Of Engineering 
For The Miamiprep Summer Camp; Florida International 
University Institute For Public Management And Community 
Service; Florida International University Jewish Museum Of 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


31 


Florida; Florida International University Mary Anne Wolfe 
Theater at Biscayne Bay Campus; Florida International 
University School of Hospitality for South Beach Wine & Food 
Festival; Florida International University School of Music for 
Cultural Arts Program Activities, Festivals and Events; Florida 
International University The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum; 
Florida International University The Wolfsonian; Florida Keys 
Concert Association; Florida Keys Council Of The Arts; Florida 
Keys History and Discovery Foundation; Florida Keys History of 
Diving Museum; Florida Keys Land & Sea Trust; Florida Literary 
Arts Coalition; Florida Maritime Museum; Florida Memorial 
University For The Lou Rawls Center For The Performing Arts; 
Florida Museum of Natural History; Florida Museum Of 
Photographic Arts; Florida Music Education Association; Florida 
Oceanographic Society; Florida Opera Prima; Florida Orchestra; 
Florida Railroad Museum; Florida Repertory Theatre; Florida 
Southern College (Lakeland); Florida State University Museum Of 
Fine Arts; Florida State University Theater; Florida Studio 
Theatre; Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra; Florida Theatre 
Performing Arts; Florida Trust for Historic Preservation; Florida 
Turkish-American Association; Florida Youth Orchestra; Florida's 
Singing Sons; For The Children (Palm Beach County); Fort 
Lauderdale Children's Theatre; Fort Lauderdale Historical 
Society; Fort Meade Chamber of Commerce; Fort Myers 
Community Concert Association Inc; Fort Myers Symphonic 
Mastersingers; Fort Myers/SW Florida American Sewing Guild; 
Fotomission; Foundation for Emerging Technologies and Arts; 
Foundation For Leon County Schools; Foundation for New 
Education Initiatives for Miami-Dade County Public Schools for 
Cultural Passport and Passport to the Arts; Foundation For The 
Preservation Of Historic American Music; Frane-Florida 
Foundation for the Arts; Frank Brown Song International 
Foundation For Music; freeFall Theatre; Fresh Start of Miami- 
Dade for Recovery in the Arts; Friday Musicale; Friends Of 
Carrollwood Cultural Center; Friends of Chamber Music of 
Miami; Friends Of Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park (Wildlife & 
Wildlands Art Show); Friends Of Dunns Creek State Park; Friends 
of Fort Taylor; Friends of Hopital Albert Schweitzer Haiti for 
Kompa in Wynwood; Friends of Key Largo Cultural Center; 
Friends of Leu Gardens; Friends Of Macarthur Beach State Park; 
Friends of Miami Marine Stadium; Friends Of Mission San Luis; 
Friends of Music Education for Haiti; Friends of Paynes Prairie; 
Friends Of Sandoway House Nature Center; Friends Of The Bass 
Museum; Friends of the Broward County Library; Friends of the 
Everglades; Friends of the Festival (TIGLFF); Friends of the 
Governor Stone; Friends of the Islamorada Area State Parks; 
Friends of the Japanese Garden; Friends of the March of the 
Living; Friends of the Miami-Dade Public Library; Friends of the 
Military Museum of South Florida at NAS Richmond; Friends of 
the Mounts Botanical Garden; Friends of the Seminole Library; 
Friends of the Young Musicians Camp; Friends of WLRN; 
Friendship Circle of Miami; Fringe Theater of Key West FKA The 
Peoples Theatre of Key West; Frog Theatrical; Frostproof 
Chamber Foundation (The Ramon Theater); Fsu Baroque 
Ensemble; FSU Museum of Fine Arts; FSU Opera Outreach; FSU 
Student Life Cinema; Ft Lauderdale Performing Arts; Ft. King 
Heritage Association - Museum And National Landmark; 
Fundarte; Future Roots Collective; Fuzion Dance; Fuzion Dance 
Artists dba Sarasota Contemporary Dance; Gables Hispanic 
Cultural Foundation; Gablestage; Gadsden Arts Inc; Gainesville 
Chamber Orchestra; Gainesville Civic Choir; Gainesville 
Community Band; Gainesville Environmental Film and Arts 
Festival; Gainesville Fine Arts Association; Gainesville Friends of 
Jazz; Gainesville Harmony Show Chorus; Gainesville Youth 
Chorus; Gallery At Westfield Broward; Gamble Plantation 
Preservation Alliance; Garden Theatre; Gargiulo Art Foundation 
Inc; Gasparilla Festival of the Arts; Gasparilla Music Foundation; 
Gateway Center for the Arts; Gator Musician Support Fund; Gay 
Men's Chorus Of South Florida; Geeki Girl; German American 
Social Club Of Greater Miami For Oktoberfest Miami And 
Cultural Activities; German School Of South Florida For 
Oktoberfest; GFAA Art Festival at Thornebrook; GFWC Pine 
Castle Woman's Club; Ghostbird Theatre Company; Giants in the 
City; Girl Museum Inc; Girlchoir Of South Florida; Girls' Club 
Foundation; Glazer Children's Museum; Global Arts Project; 

32 


Global Arts Society Corporation; Global Peace Film Festival; 
Gloria Musicae; GodoyPradera Projects; Gold Coast Jazz 
Society; Gold Coast Railroad Museum; Gold Coast Theatre 
Company; Goldsboro West Side Community Historical 
Association; Golisano Children's Museum of Naples; Goodland 
Arts Alliance; Goodwood Museum And Gardens; Grace Arts 
Center; Grand Central District Association; Great Explorations; 
Great Gulf Coast Art Festival; Great Taste of the Grove Food 
and Wine Festival; Greater Caribbean American Cultural 
Coalition; Greater Delray Beach Chamber Commerce; Greater 
Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau; Greater Miami 
Billfish Tournament for Baywalk Arts Festival; Greater Miami 
Community Concert Band; Greater Miami Convention and 
Visitors Bureau for Cultural Publications & Events Calendar; 
Greater Miami Festivals and Events Association; Greater Miami 
Youth Symphony of Dade County, Florida; Greater Pensacola 
Symphony Orchestra; Greater South Dade/South Miami/Kendall 
Chamber of Commerce; Greater St. Paul A.M.E. Church for The 
Coconut Grove Black Heritage Music Series; Green Mobility 
Network; Ground Up and Rising; Growing Hope Foundation; 
Guitars Over Guns Organization; Gulf Coast Big Band Inc; Gulf 
Coast Kiln Walk Society Inc; Gulf Coast Symphony Inc; Gulfshore 
Ballet Inc; Gulfshore Opera; Gulfshore Playhouse; Haitian 
American Art Network; Haitian American Historical Society; 
Haitian American Youth Organization; Haitian Heritage Museum 
Corp.; Halifax Historical Society; Hands on Childrens Museum 
Inc; Hapco Music Foundation; Harrison Center for The Visual & 
Performing Arts; Harry P. Leu Gardens; Harvey Milk Festival; 

HCC Gallery 221, Dale Mabry Campus; HCC Theatre Dept., Ybor 
Campus; HCC Ybor Art Gallery; Heartland Cultural Alliance Inc; 
Heathcote Botanical Gardens Inc; Henry B. Plant Museum; Henry 
Morrison Flagler Museum; Henry Nehrling Society (DBA Nehrling 
Gardens); Heritage Museum Assoc.; Heritage Preservation Trust; 
Hermitage Artist Retreat; Hernando DeSoto Historical Society; 
Heroes Unite; Highlands Arts League Inc; Highlands Little 
Theatre; Hillsborough Arts; Hillsborough County Public Art 
Program; Hillsborough County Public Library Cooperative; 
Hippodrome State Theatre; Hispanic Education; Hispanic 
Flamenco Ballet Ensemble; Hispanic Heritage Literature 
Organization Corp.; Hispanic-American Lyric Theatre; Historic 
Florida Keys Foundation; Historic Haile Homestead; Historic 
Hampton House Community Trust Inc; Historic Markers; Historic 
Polk Theatre, The; Historic Sanford Welcome Center; Historic 
Society; Historic Spanish Point; Historic St. Augustine Research 
Institute; Historic Stranahan House; Historical Association Of 
Southern Florida Dba History Miami; Historical Association Of 
Southern Florida Endowment Fund; Historical Society Of Palm 
Beach County; Hobe Sound Chamber of Commerce; Hoedowners 
Pairs and Spares Square Dance Club; Hollywood Art And Culture 
Center; Holocaust Documentation and Education Center for 
Miami-Dade County Student Awareness Day; Holocaust 
Education Resource Council (Here); Holocaust Memorial 
Committee for The Holocaust Memorial; Holocaust Memorial 
Resource and Education Center of Florida; Holocaust Museum & 
Ed. Center of SW FL; Homestead Center for the Arts; Homestead 
Community Concert Association; Homestead Main Street; 
Homestead Rodeo Association; Homo Sapiens; Horticultural Arts 
& Parks; Howard and Patricia Farber Foundation; Hub On Canal; 
Ife-lle; llluminArts; Use Newell Fund For The Performing Arts - 
Inconcert; Images: A Festival of the Arts; Imaginaria; Imaginarium 
Science Center; Imperial Symphony Orchestra; Indian Horizon of 
Florida; Inffinito Arts Foundation for Brazilian Film Festival of 
Miami; I nish/T rinity; INK Miami Art Fair; Inside Out Theatre 
Company; Insomniac Theatre Company; Inspirit; Institute for 
Nonprofit Innovation and Excellence; Institute of Contemporary 
Art, Miami; Instituto Cultural de Mexico (ICM Miami); Instituto de 
Cultura Peruana; International Fringe Festival of Central Florida 
(DBA Orlando Fringe); Investigation Station Inc; Iranian 
American Society Of Daytona Beach; Irish Repertory Theater; 
Irma and Norman Braman Art Foundation; Islamorada 
Community Entertainment; Islamorada Foundation; Island Art 
Association; Island Players; Island Theater Company; Italian Film 
Festival; Jack & Lee Rosen Jewish Community Center; 
Jacksonville Children's Chorus; Jacksonville Concert Ballet 
Company Inc; Jacksonville Dance Theatre; Jacksonville 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


Symphony Association; Jacksonville Zoological Society Inc; 
Japan-America Society Of Northwest Florida; Jay I. Kislak 
Foundation; Jayadevi Arts; Jazz Club of Sarasota; Jazz Educator 
Community Coalition; Jazz Society of Pensacola; JazzSIam Aka 
Academics Through Jazz; Jensen Beach Art League; Jobsite 
Theater; Joe Tedder Tax Collector/Kids Tag Art; John G. Riley 
House Museum; John S. and James L. Knight Foundation for 
Knight Arts Challenge; Jorge M. Perez Art Museum Of Miami- 
Dade County; Josee Garant Dance; Juggerknot Theatre 
Corporation; Junior Orange Bowl Committee; Just Bee 
Movement; Kaleidoscope MusArts; Kaleidoscope Theatre; Karen 
Peterson And Dancers; Kashmir Hindu Foundation for Kashmir 
Hindu Heritage Day; Kendall Art Cultural Center; Key Biscayne 
Chamber of Commerce for The Visitor Center; Key Biscayne 
Community Foundation For The 57th Annual Key Biscayne 4th of 
July Parade; Key Chorale; Key Players; Key West Art and 
Historical Society; Key West Art Center; Key West Botanical 
Garden Society; Key West Council on the Arts; Key West Cultural 
Preservation Society; Key West Garden Club; Key West Harry S. 
Truman Foundation; Key West Literary Seminar; Key West 
Maritime Historical Society; Key West Players; Keys Community 
School of the Arts; Keys to Peace; Kinad; King Mango Strut; 
Kiwanis Club of Little Havana for Calle Ocho Festival & 

Carnaval Miami; Krone; Kuyayky Foundation; L.B. Brown House; 
La Musica di Asolo; Lab 9 for Them Beaux; LaboMamo, 
Collaborative Performance Group; Laboratory Theater of 
Florida; Lafayette Center for the Arts; Lake Concert Band; Lake 
Eustis Museum Of Art; Lake Wales Arts Center at Polk State 
College; Lake Wales Arts Council; Lake Wales Little Theatre; 
Lake Wales Museum and Cultural Center; Lake Wales Public 
Library; Lake Worth Playhouse; Lake Worth Public Library; 
Lakeland Art Guild; Lakeland Center; Lakeland Community 
Theatre; Las Damas de Arte; Latin Academy Of Recording Arts & 
Sciences; Latin Grammy Cultural Foundation; Latin Songwriters 
Hall of Fame; Latina Women's League; Leadership Prep 
Foundation for Coconut Grove Goombay Carnival Festival; Lee 
County Alliance Of The Arts Inc; Lee County Pipes And Drums; 
Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art; Leesburg Art Festival; Legacy 
School Of The Performing Arts Training Institute; Lemon City 
Cemetery Community Corporation for Handel's Messiah; 
Lemoyne Art Foundation; LeRoy Collins Leon County Public 
Library; Les DeMerle Amelia Island Jazz Festival; Library 
Foundation Of Martin County; Life Enrichment Center; Life is Art; 
Light Box at Goldman Warehouse; Light Of Joy Ballet; 

Lighthouse Art Center; Lightner Museum Of Hobbies; Lip Service; 
Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County; Literacy Volunteers of 
America - Monroe County; Little Haiti Housing Association; Little 
Haiti Optimist Foundation for Haitian Heritage Cultural Month; 
Little Theatre of New Smyrna Beach; Live Oak Artists Guild Inc; 
Living Arts Trust Dba O Cinema; Locust Projects; Loggerhead 
Marinelife Center; Longboat Key Center For The Arts; Longwood 
Historic Society; Lost Girls Theatre; Love Your Shorts Film 
Festival; Lovewell Institute for the Creative Arts; Lowry Park 
Zoological Society of Tampa; Loxahatchee River Historical 
Society (dba Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum); Lucky Bruno 
Circus Theater; Lyric Theatre; M Ensemble Company; Mac Fine 
Art; MacDonald Training Center (Fine Arts Studios); Machol 
Miami Corporation; Mad Cat Theatre Company; Mad Cow 
Theatre Company; Maggie Allesee National Center for 
Choreography (MANCC); Magic of Bronze; Maitland Art & 
History Museums (Maitland Art Association and Maitland 
Historical Society); Maltz Jupiter Theatre; Manatee Community 
Concert Band; Manatee County Agricultural Museum; Manatee 
County Cultural Alliance; Manatee County Historical Records 
Library; Manatee Haven Decorative Artists; Manatee Performing 
Arts Center; Manatee Village Historical Park; Mangrove Creative 
Collective; Marathon Community Theatre; Marathon Garden 
Club; Marco Island Historical Society; Marie Selby Botanical 
Gardens; Marine Industries Association of CC; Marine Resources 
Development Foundation; Marion Ballet Theatre; Marion Bonsai 
Society; Marion Civic Chorale; Marion County Literacy Council; 
Marion County Public Library - Create Art Program; Marion 
County Public Schools (music and art programs); Marion Cultural 
Alliance; Marjory Stoneman Douglas Biscayne Nature Center; 
Marti Productions; Martin County Fair; Martin County Library 


System; Martin Luther King Economic Development Corporation 
for Martin Luther King Candlelight Memorial and Gospel 
Concert; Martin Luther King Jr Commission of Florida; Martin 
Luther King Jr. Coordinating Committee; Martin Theater Inc; 
Martin Z. Margulies Foundation; Mary S. Harrell Black Heritage 
Museum; Master Chorale of South Florida (Broward County 
activities); Master Chorale of South Florida (Miami-Dade County 
performances); Master Chorale Of Tampa Bay; Master The 
Possibilities; Masterworks Chorus of the Palm Beaches; 

Matheson History Museum; Maxwell C King Center; McCauley 
Fund to Cure Paralysis; McIntyre Institute; Mckee Botanical 
Gardens; MDGLCC Foundation for LGBT Visitor Center; ME 
Dance DBA Dance Theatre of Orlando; Mead Botanical Garden; 
Meek Eaton Southeast Regional Black Archives; Mel Fisher 
Maritime Heritage Society; Melbourne Chamber Music Society; 
Melbourne Municipal Band Association; Melody & Harmony 
Music Foundation; Melon Patch Players; Mennello Museum of 
American Art; Merrick Festival; Messiah Choral Society; Mexican- 
American Council; Miami Acting Company; Miami Art Club; 

Miami Arts Parade Foundation; Miami Bach Society; Miami 
Beach - Miami, LGBT Sports & Cultural League for Collins Park 
Cultural Arts Festival; Miami Beach Arts Trust; Miami Beach 
Chamber of Commerce for Visit Miami Beach; Miami Beach Film 
Society; Miami Beach Garden Conservancy For Miami Beach 
Botanical Garden; Miami Beach Gay Pride for the Miami Beach 
Gay Pride Parade and Festival; Miami Beach Jewish Community 
Center for Community Arts & Cultural Programs; Miami Beach 
Latin Chamber of Commerce for Tourist Hospitality Center; 
Miami Beach Stage; Miami Biennale; Miami Carnival; Miami 
Center for Architecture & Design; Miami Chamber Music Society; 
Miami Children's Chorus; Miami Children's Museum; Miami City 
Ballet (Broward County activities); Miami City Ballet (Miami- 
Dade activities); Miami Classical Guitar Society; Miami 
Conservatory of Music; Miami Contemporary Dance Corp. dba 
Miami Contemporary; Miami Council for International Visitors; 
Miami Dade College - Koubek Center; Miami Dade College - 
Museum of Art and Design; Miami Dade College - New World 
School Of The Arts - Dance Division; Miami Dade College - New 
World School Of The Arts - Theater Department; Miami Dade 
College - Teatro Prometeo; Miami Dade College for Department 
of Arts and Philosophy, North Campus; Miami Dade College For 
Lynn And Louis Wolfson II Florida Moving Image Archives; Miami 
Dade College For Miami Book Fair International; Miami Dade 
College For Miami Book Fair Year-Round; Miami Dade College 
For Miami International Film Festival; Miami Dade College For 
Tower Theater; Miami Dade College Freedom Tower Cultural 
Center Renovation Project; Miami Dade College Kendall campus 
- Alfred L. McCarthy Theater; Miami Dade College North 
Campus - William and Joan Lehman Theater; Miami Dade 
College, Cultural Affairs Department (Mdc Live Arts); Miami 
Dade College, Wolfson: Dept, of Arts and Philosophy; Miami 
Dance Futures; Miami Dance Project; Miami Design Preservation 
League; Miami Downtown Development Authority for Cultural 
Festivals & Events; Miami Gay & Lesbian Film Festival; Miami 
Gay Men's Chorus; Miami Hispanic Ballet Corp.; Miami Hoshuko; 
Miami International Jazz Fest; Miami Jazz Cooperative; Miami 
Light Project; Miami Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually 
Impaired for Better Chance Music Production Program; Miami 
Lyric Opera; Miami Momentum Dance Company; Miami Music 
Association For Cleveland Orchestra Miami; Miami Music 
Institute; Miami Music Project, ; Miami Northwest Express Track 
Club for 41st Annual Northwest Track and Field Classic; Miami 
Oratorio Society; Miami Piano Circle; Miami Rail Publishing 
Corporation; Miami River Fund for Miami River Day; Miami 
Shores Arts Commission for Community Center Cultural Arts 
Programs & Events; Miami Short Film Festival; Miami Springs 
Historical Society; Miami Stage Company/Miami Children's 
Theater; Miami Symphony Orchestra/Orquesta Sinfonica De 
Miami; Miami Theater Center; Miami Theater Hub; Miami 
Watercolor Society; Miami Wind Symphony; Miami Woman's 
Club Cultural Center; Miami World Cinema Center; Miami Youth 
Ballet; Miami Youth for Chamber Music; Miami-Broward One 
Carnival Host Committee; Miami-Dade Beacon Council for Arts & 
Business; Miami-Dade County - Sandrell Rivers Theatre; Miami- 
Dade County Aviation Dept. Div. of Fine Arts & Cultural Affairs; 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


33 


Miami-Dade County Days; Miami-Dade County Department of 
Cultural Affairs; Miami-Dade County Fair & Exposition; Miami- 
Dade County for Westchester Cultural Arts Center at Tropical 
Park; Miami-Dade County Office of Community Advocacy; 
Miami-Dade County Office of Film & Entertainment; Miami-Dade 
County Parks, Recreation & Open Spaces Dept, of Fruit & Spice 
Park for Cultural Activities & Special Events; Miami-Dade County 
Parks, Recreation And Open Spaces - Disability Services For In- 
Park Arts Series; Miami-Dade County Parks, Recreation and 
Open Spaces Department, Deering Estate at Cutler; Miami-Dade 
historical Maritime Museum; Miami-Dade Public Library System; 
Miami's Independent Thinkers; Michael Joseph Brink Foundation; 
Michael-Ann Russel Jewish Community Center; Michelee 
Puppets; Mickee Faust Alternative Performance Club; 

Mideastern Dance Exchange; Midtown Arts Enrichment Corp.; 
Milagro Foundation; MIMO Biscayne Association; Mind & 

Melody; Miramar Cultural Center, City of Miramar; Moksha 
Family Arts Collective; Monroe County Public Library; 
Montgomery Botanical Center; Monticello Acting And Dance Co.; 
Monticello Opera House; Morada Way Arts & Cultural District; 
Morean Arts Center; Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens; 
Mote Marine Laboratory; Motivational Edge; Mound House; 
Mount Dora Center For The Arts; Mount Dora Music Festival; 
Mounts Botanical Garden of Palm Beach County; Moving 
Current; Mulberry Cultural Center; Murray Dranoff Foundation; 
Museum Of Contemporary Art (Miami-Dade County); Museum Of 
Contemporary Art Jacksonville; Museum Of Discovery & Science; 
Museum Of Fine Arts Of St. Petersburg, FL; Museum of Florida 
History; Museum of Military History; Museum of Science & 

Industry (MOSI); Museum of the Americas; Museum Of Vanning 
And Hall Of Fame Inc; Music For Minors Foundation (Collier 
County); Music in Miami; Music Theater Bavaria (DBA 
Musiktheater Bavaria); Musica Sacra Cantorum; Musicall; 

Mystery Park Arts Company dba SoBe Institute of the Arts; Mz. 
Goose; Name Publications; Naples Art Association; Naples Ballet; 
Naples Botanical Garden Inc; Naples Concert Band Inc; Naples 
Italian American Foundation; Naples Jazz Society; Naples Music 
Club; Naples Orchestra & Chorus (I Musici Di Napoli Inc); Naples 
Players Inc; Naples Porcelain Artists; Naples Quilters Guild Inc; 
Naples Zoo Inc; Nathan B. Stubblefield Foundation (dba WMNF); 
National Art Exhibitions of the Mentally III (Broward County 
Activities); National Art Exhibitions of the Mentally III (Miami 
activities); National Auxiliary Association; National Foundation 
For Advancement In The Arts Dba Young Arts; National Jewish 
Theater Foundation; National LGBTQ Task Force for the 2016 
Winter Party Festival; National Naval Aviation Museum; National 
Performance Network for Creative Exchange Residency Program 
in Miami-Dade; National Society Of Tole & Decorative Painters 
Inc (Naples Decorative Artists); National Tropical Botanical 
Garden for The Kampong; Native Heritage Gathering; Nazmo 
Dance Collective; Negro Spiritual Scholarship Foundation; 
Neuroscience Centers of Florida Foundation for MS Art Therapy; 
New Light Foundation; New River Orchestra; New Tampa 
Players; New Theater Foundation; New Theatre; New Vision 
Gospel Community Choir; New World Symphony; No. 9 
Productions dba MASS Visual Arts; North Central Florida Blues 
Society; North Florida Botanical Society; North Florida Fair; 

North Miami Community Concert Band; North Port Art Center; 
North Port Chorale; North Port Concert Band; North Port 
Symphony; North West Florida Symphony Guild; Northeast 
Second Avenue Partnership for Poetic Lakay and Art Beat Miami; 
Northwest Florida Ballet Inc; Norton Museum Of Art; Nostos; 

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale; Nu Deco Ensemble; Nu 
Flamenco Collaborative; Nuestro Legado Cultural; NWD 
Projects; Ocala Art Group; Ocala Civic Theatre; Ocala Film 
Foundation; Ocala Storytelling Festival; Ocala Symphony 
Orchestra; Ocean Reef Art League; Ocean Reef Cultural Center; 
Odli; Old Davie Historical; Old Dillard Foundation; Old Island 
Restoration Foundation; Old School Square Center For The Arts; 
Olympia Center; Opa-locka Community Development 
Corporation for 2016 Meta Series; Opening Nights Performing 
Arts; Opera Atelier; Opera Guild; Opera Guild of Fort 
Lauderdale; Opera Naples; Opera Orlando; Orange Bowl 
Committee for Orange Bowl Festival; Orange County Arts & 
Cultural Affairs; Orange County Library System; Orange County 

34 


Regional History Center; Orchestra Miami; Orlando Ballet; 
Orlando Film Festival; Orlando Fire Museum; Orlando Gay 
Chorus; Orlando Museum of Art; Orlando Philharmonic 
Orchestra; Orlando Repertory Theatre; Orlando Science Center; 
Orlando Shakespeare Theater; Orlando Urban Film Festival; 
Ormond Beach Historical Society; Ormond Memorial Art Museum 
& Gardens; Osceola Arts; Osceola County Historical Society; 
Osceola High School Band Association; Overtown Music & Arts 
Festival; Oxbow Eco-Center; Palladium Theater; Palm Beach 
Book Festival; Palm Beach County Library System; Palm Beach 
Dramaworks; Palm Beach International Film Festival; Palm Beach 
Opera; Palm Beach Photographic Centre; Palm Beach Poetry 
Festival; Palm Beach Pops; Palm Beach State College Theatres; 
Palm Beach Symphony; Palm City Art Associates; Palm Coast 
Arts Foundation Inc; Palmetto Historical Park; PAN Performing 
Arts Network, A Guild of Performing Artists; Panama City Pops 
Orchestra Inc; Paper Museum; Paradise Ballet Theatre 
Presenters; Park Project for Arts Festival; Parks Foundation of 
Miami-Dade for Special and Cultural Events; Parrish Arts 
Council; Pas de Vie; Pasco Fine Arts Council; PATH: Preserving, 
Archiving & Teaching Hiphop; Patricia And Phillip Frost Museum 
Of Science (Dba Miami Science Museum); Patrons of Exceptional 
Artists; PAXY; Peabody Auditorium Foundation; Peace Mural 
Foundation; Peace River Woodturners; Pelican Playhouse; 
Pembroke Pines Theater of the Performing Arts; Pensacola Bay 
Center; Pensacola Children's Chorus; Pensacola Civic Band; 
Pensacola Little Theatre; Pensacola Mess Hall; Pensacola 
Museum Of Art; Pensacola Opera; Pensacola Symphony 
Orchestra; Pensacola Winterfest; Performing Arts Center of Key 
West; Performing Arts Center Trust (Aka Adrienne Arsht Center 
For The Performing Arts Of Miami-Dade County; Performing Arts 
of Maitland; Perlman Music Program/Suncoast; Peter London 
Global Dance Company, Inc.; PhilanthroFest International; 
Philippine Cultural Foundation; Philippine Performing Arts 
Company; Philippine-American Society; Pigeon Key Foundation; 
Pine Castle Historical Society; Pinecrest Premier Soccer for the 
2016 Adidas Mega Cup Miami; Pinellas Park Cultural Affairs; 
Pinellas Youth Symphony; Pioneer Garden Club of Ocala; 

Pioneer Settlement For The Creative Arts; Pioneer Winter 
Collective; Plant City Entertainment; Platform Art; Players 
(Sarasota); Polk Arts Alliance; Polk County History Center; Polk 
Museum Of Art; Polk Theatre; Polynesian Culture Association; 
Ponce Inlet Historical Museum; Power 2 Voice, Corp.; Power 
Access; Powerstories Theatre of Tampa Bay; Pridelines Youth 
Services; PRIZM Art Fair; Protect Key West and the Florida Keys; 
Public Arts & Music; Pulse Chamber Music; Pulse Miami Beach 
Contemporary Art Fair; Puppet Guild of South Florida; Puppet 
Network; Pyramid Studios; Quiltfest Inc Of Jacksonville Florida; 
Quilting Guild of the Villages; Quincy Music Theatre; R.P.M. 
Dance; Racial Harmony Task Force; Ramon Theatre; Raymond F. 
Kravis Center For The Performing Arts; Reading Queer Literary 
Festival; Realize Bradenton; Red Barn Actors Studio; Red 
Chemistry; Red Dot Miami; Redland Orchid Festivals for Redland 
International Orchid Festival; Redland Tropical Gardens & 
Botanical Foundation; Reef Relief; Reflections of Manatee; Reilly 
Arts Center; Revelation Community Education Center for CAMP; 
Rhythm Foundation; Richmond Heights Community Association 
for Community Tree Lighting Festival; Ridge Art Association; 
Ringling College of Art & Design; Ringling Museum Of Art; Ritz 
Community Theater Project dba Wayne Densch Performing Arts 
Center; Ritz Theatre; River District Alliance (Downtown 
Management Corp Of Ft Myers Florida); Riverside Fine Arts 
Association Inc; Riverside Theatre; Riverwalk Fort Lauderdale; 
Robert Sharon Chorale; Romanza St. Augustine; Ronald 
McDonald House Charities of Southwest Florida (Brew-Ha-Ha 
Craft Beer Festival); Rotary Club of Key Biscayne Foundation for 
Key Biscayne Arts Festival; Rotary Foundation of South Miami 
For South Miami Rotary Art Festival; Roth Family Jewish 
Community Center of Greater Orlando; Roxy Theatre Group; 
Russian Ballet; Ruth Eckerd Hall; S.E. Volusia Historical Society 
Museum; Sabrina Cohen Foundation for Adaptive Arts at Beach 
for ALL; Saenger Theatre; Saint Andrew Greek Orthodox Church 
of Kendall for Saint Andrew Greek Festival; Saint Martha 
Concerts and Cultural Affairs; Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art; 
Sands Theater Center/ Athens Theatre; Sanibel Music Festival; 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


Santa Fe College (Cultural Programs); Santa Fe College 
(Showcase Santa Fe); Santa Fe College (Spring Arts Festival); 
Sarasota Ballet; Sarasota BCS Festival 2014 Corp.; Sarasota 
Chorus of The Keys; Sarasota Concert Association; Sarasota 
Concert Band; Sarasota Contemporary Dance; Sarasota Cuban 
Ballet School; Sarasota Film Festival; Sarasota Film Society; 
Sarasota Institute of Lifetime Learning; Sarasota Opera 
Association; Sarasota Orchestra; Sarasota Pops Orchestra; 
Sarasota Young Voices; SBC Community Development 
Corporation for SBC Youth Zone S.T.R.E.A.M.S. Summer 
Program; Schmidt Family Centre For The Arts At Mizner Park; 
School of Russian Ballet; School Of The Arts Foundation; 
Schooner Western Union Preservation Society; SCOPE Miami 
Beach; Scottish Heritage Society Of Sarasota; Seacamp 
Association; Second Avenue Studio (Name changed to 
MetroLAB); Second Time Arounders; Seminole Cultural Arts 
Council; Seminole Cultural Arts Theatre; Seminole Warhawk 
Band Aide Boosters; Sequoia Foundation for Achievement in the 
Arts & Education; Seraphic Fire (Broward activities); Seraphic 
Fire (Miami activities); Shakespeare In Performance; 

Shakespeare in the Park Miami; Sharing Tree; Shell Museum & 
Educational Foundation; Shimmy Club; Shine Performing/ Pine 
Hills Community Performing Arts Center; Shira Abergel for Baba 
Yaga Traveling Arts Wagon; Shoestring Theater; Siempre 
Flamenco; Siman Orchestral Foundation, Corp.; Sinfonia Gulf 
Coast; Siren Arts; Sister Cities of Volusia County; Sistrunk 
Historical Festival; Site95: Patric McDonough: Awning Studios, 
White Turf, and Wall Mural in Wynwood; Siudy Flamenco Dance 
Theater; Snap!; Sociedad Pro Arte Grateli; Society of the Four 
Arts; Sol Children Theatre Troupe; Sons Of The American 
Revolution, Florida Society; Sosyete Koukouy Miami; South Beach 
Chamber Ensemble; South Dade Expressions; South Florida Art 
Center Dba Artcenter/South Florida; South Florida Art 
Enrichment; South Florida Autism Charter Schools for the Annual 
Miami International Agriculture, Horse & Cattle Show; South 
Florida Ballet Theater; South Florida Bluegrass Association; 
South Florida Boys Choir; South Florida Center for Percussive 
Arts; South Florida Chamber Ensemble; South Florida Chamber 
Ensemble for Summer Games; South Florida Chapter of the 
American Liszt Society; South Florida Composers Alliance; South 
Florida Deaf Recreation Association for The National Theatre of 
the Deaf Project; South Florida Fair and Palm Beach County 
Expositions; South Florida Friends of Classical Music; South 
Florida Jazz; South Florida Jubilee Chorus; South Florida Lindy 
Collective; South Florida Lindy Collective Corporation; South 
Florida Museum And Bishop Planetarium; South Florida Musical 
Guild (South Florida Pride Wind Ensemble) ; South Florida 
National Parks Trust for Community Artists Program at Biscayne 
National Park; South Florida Orchid Society for The Miami 
International Orchid Show; South Florida PBS (WPBT); South 
Florida Pioneer Museum; South Florida Reuse and Recycling 
Institute; South Florida Science Center and Aquarium; South 
Florida Symphony Orchestra (Broward County activities); South 
Florida Symphony Orchestra (Monroe County); South Florida 
Youth Symphony; Southeast Review; Southeastern University 
College of Arts & Media; Southern Atellier; Southern 
Shakespeare Company; Southern Winds Theatre; Southwest 
Florida Historical Society; Southwest Florida Pastel Society; 
Southwest Florida Symphony Orchestra And Chorus Association; 
Space Coast Flute Orchestra; Spady Cultural Heritage Museum; 
Spanish Lyric Theatre; Spotlight Theatre of Central Florida; 
Springs River Festival; St Johns County Cultural Council; St 
Petersburg Arts Advisory Committee; St. Augustine Community 
Chorus; St. Augustine Lighthouse and Maritime Museum; St. 
Johns River Festival of the Arts; St. Luke's Concert Series; St. 
Michael's Cemetery Foundation of Pensacola; St. Patrick’s Day 
Committee; St. Pete Pride; St. Petersburg Arts Alliance; St. 
Petersburg City Theater; St. Petersburg International Folk Fair 
Society; St. Petersburg Opera Company; St. Petersburg 
Preservation; St. Petersburg Public Arts Commission; St. Sophia 
Greek Orthodox Community for St. Sophia Greek Festival of 
Miami; St. Stephen's Episcopal Church for the 27th Annual St. 
Stephen's Art Show; Stage Aurora Theatrical Company Inc; 
Stageworks; Star Center Children's Theatre; Stars of the 
Performing Arts; State College Of Florida (Fine Art Gallery); 


Steinway Society of Central Florida; Stiltsville Trust; Stonewall 
Library & Archives; Stop, Breathe and Smile, Inc.; Straz Center 
For The Performing Arts; Street Painting Festival; Studio @620; 
Studios Of Key West; Sun Country Dance Theatre; Suncoast 
Young Peoples Theatre Inc; Sunfest Of Palm Beach County; 
Sunflower Society; Sunrise Pops; Sunrise Theatre For The 
Performing Arts; Sunrise Theatre Foundation Inc; Sunshine Jazz 
Organization; Surf-Bal-Bay Public Library; Suwannee Spirit Kids 
Music Camp; Swamp Buggy; SWFL Museum of History; Swfl 
Veterans Alliance Inc; Swing and Jazz Preservation Society; 
Symphonic Chorale of Southwest Florida; Symphony Of The 
Americas; Take Stock; Tallahassee Community Chorus; 
Tallahassee Bach Parley; Tallahassee Ballet; Tallahassee Civic 
Chorale; Tallahassee Film Society; Tallahassee Latin Dance 
Festival; Tallahassee Museum; Tallahassee Music Week; 
Tallahassee Symphony Orchestra; Tallahassee Writers 
Association ; Tallahassee Youth Orchestras; Tampa Bay Arts & 
Education Network; Tampa Bay Black Heritage Festival; Tampa 
Bay Businesses for Culture and the Arts; Tampa Bay Children's 
Chorus; Tampa Bay Community Network; Tampa Bay Heralds Of 
Harmony Chorus; Tampa Bay History Center; Tampa Bay 
Symphony; Tampa Film Institute (dba Gasparilla International 
Film Festival); Tampa Metropolitan Youth Orchestra; Tampa 
Museum Of Art; Tampa Oratorio Singers; Tampa Realistic Artists; 
Tampa Repertory Theatre; Tampa Theatre; Tampa-Hillsborough 
County Storytelling Festival; Taras Oceanographic Foundation; 
Tarpon Arts, City of Tarpon Springs; Teatro Avante; Teatro en 
Miami Corp.; Televisa Foundation; Television Association of 
Programmers - Latin America; Temple Terrace Arts Council; 
Tempus Projects; Tennessee Williams Key West Exhibit; Theater 
With A Mission; Theatre and Music Arts; Theatre Conspiracy; 
Theatre Jacksonville; Theatre League Of South Florida; Theatre 
Tallahassee; Theatre Winter Haven; Theatre-Go-Round; 
Theatreworks (Jacksonville); Theatrezone; Theodore Gibson 
Memorial Fund for TRGM - STEAM Into Construction; This is for 
the Kids for Homestead Rock 'N Ribfest; Thomas Armour Youth 
Ballet; Thomas Center Associates; Thought Loom; Thursday 
Musicale; Tigertail Productions; Timucua Arts Foundation; 
Titusville Art League; TL Tango Lovers Organization; Toast Of 
Tampa Show Chorus; Town of Bay Harbor Islands for Bay Harbor 
Cultural Center; Town of Davie Special Projects/Cultural Arts; 
Town of Miami Lakes (special events and cultural programs); 
Tradisyon Lakou Lakay; Treasure Coast Community Singers; 
Treasure Coast Music Teachers Association; Treasure Coast 
Youth Symphony; Treasures of Madison County; Trenton's 
Suwannee Valley Quilt Festival; Trinity Cathedral for Cultural 
Arts Events and Programs; Trophia Butterfly Foundation; Tropic 
Cinema; Tropical Audubon Society; Tropical Everglades Visitor 
Association; Two Feathers Corporation; U.S. Coast Guard Pipe 
Band; Ukranian Dancers of Miami; Una Vision Radio; Una Voce: 
The Florida Men's Chorale; Uncommon Friends Foundation; 
Unconservatory; United Arts Council Of Collier County Inc; 

United Arts Of Central Florida; United Chinese Association of 
Florida for South Florida Dragon Boat Festival at Haulover 
Beach Park; United Daughters Of The Confederacy 2317 Gen 
Joseph Johnston Chapter; United Daughters Of The 
Confederacy 2496 Kate Dilworth Scott; United Daughters Of 
The Confederacy Martha Reid Chapter No 19; United Jewish 
Generations for Fine Arts and Culture for the Elderly; United 
States Artists for Artists Assembly; United Way of Miami-Dade 
for Veritage Miami; Uniting Local Artists; Unity 
Coalition/Coalicion Unida; University Area Community 
Development Corporation; University of Florida (College of the 
Arts); University of Florida (Gallery); University of Florida (Health 
Shands Arts In Medicine); University of Florida (Performing Arts); 
University of Miami for Maurice Gusman Concert hall; University 
of Miami for The Jerry Herman Ring Theatre; University Of Miami 
Frost School Of Music For Festival Miami; University Of Miami 
Lowe Art Museum; University of Western (Historic Trust); 
University Of Wynwood; Urban Reflection for The Art of Fashion; 
Urban Think Foundation; Urbanite Theatre; Urgent for Arts & 
Cultural Programs; Usa Dance - Ocala Chapter; USA Dance(DBA 
Orlando Chapter Of USA Dance); USA Dance, Greater Daytona 
Chapter; USF Contemporary Art Museum; USF Graphicstudio; 
USF School of Art and Art History; UT Scarfone/Hartley Gallery; 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


35 


V.E.T.; Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall; Venice Art Center; 

Venice Chorale; Venice Symphony; Venice Theatre; Venue 
Theater And Actors Studio; Vero Beach Art Club; Vero Beach 
Museum Of Art; Vero Beach Opera; Vero Beach Theatre Guild; 
Viernes Culturales/Cultural Fridays; Viking Music Patrons 
Association; Village of Biscayne Park for Art in the Park; Village 
of Key Biscayne for Art in Public Places, Cultural and Special 
Events; Village of Miami Shores Brockway Memorial Library; 
Village of Miami Shores Fine Arts Programs & Special Events; 
Village of Palmetto Bay - Art in Public Places; Village Of 
Pinecrest For Pinecrest Gardens, Historic Preservation, Special 
Events, Festivals And Art In Public Places Program; Villagers; 
Villages Theater Company Inc; Virginia Key Beach Park Trust; 
Visionary School of Arts; Visual Artist Society / Webber Gallery 
At Cf; Vizcaya Museum And Gardens; Vizcaya Museum and 
Gardens Trust; Voci Dance; Voices Rising Community Chorus; 
Voices United; Volusia Community Symphony; Volusia County 
Fair Association; Volusia Literacy Council; VSA Arts of Florida, 
Volusia County Affiliate; VSA Florida; VSA Florida (Palm Beach 
County); Walenstein Musical Organizations; Warehouse Arts 
District Association; Waving Hands; Way Way Way Off 
Broadway Players Inc; WCOT ; We The People Theater; Weavers 
Of Char- Lee; Wekiva River Players; West Arts for The West End 
Community Arts Festival; West Coast Muscle Car Club; West 
Coast Players; West Florida Historic Preservation (UWF Historic 
Trust); West Pasco Art Guild Inc; West Volusia Historical Society; 
Westchester Cultural Arts Center Capital Project; Westcoast 
Black Theatre Troupe; WFSU Public Media; Wgcu Public Media; 
Will Mclean Foundation; William Augustus Bowles Museum And 
Historical Foundation; Wings Over Miami Museum; Winter 
Garden Art Association; Winter Garden Heritage Foundation; 
Winter Park Historical Association; Winter Park History Museum; 
Winter Park Playhouse; Winter Park Public Library; Winter Park 


Sidewalk Festival; Winthrop Arts; WJCT; Woman’s Exchange Of 
St Augustine; Women In The Visual Arts; Women's International 
Film & Arts Festival; Women's Resource Center; Words Off The 
Paper; World Federation of Ballroom Dancers; World Literacy 
Crusade of FL/Girl Power; World Upside Down; WUCF TV; 
WVFS Radio; WVUM; Wynwood Arts District Association ; Ybor 
City Museum Society; Yo Best Productions Corp.; YOPP; Young 
Actors Theatre; Young Artists Awards Inc; Young At Art Of 
Broward; Young Men's Christian Association of South Florida for 
Jr. Marine Biology Camp; Young Musicians Organization; Young 
Patronesses of the Opera; Young Performing Artists; Young 
Singers Of The Palm Beaches; Youth Orchestra of Palm Beach 
County; Zenviba Academy of Art and Science; Zoetic Stage; Zoo 
Miami; Zoo Miami Foundation; Zoological Society of the Palm 
Beaches (dba Palm Beach Zoo and Conservation Society); and 
Zunzun Art & Education. 

The State of Florida’s Participating 
Cultural Event Attendees 

Additionally, this study could not have been 
completed without the cooperation of the 35,967 
arts and cultural audience members who 
generously took the time to complete the 
audience-intercept survey while attending a 
performance, event, or exhibit within the State of 
Florida during calendar year 2016. 


About the Division of Cultural Affairs 

The Florida Department of State’s Division of Cultural Affairs is Florida's legislatively designated state 
arts agency. The Division promotes the arts and culture as essential to quality of life for all Floridians. To 
achieve its mission, the Division funds and supports cultural programs that provide artistic excellence, 
diversity, education, access and economic vitality for Florida’s communities. For more information, visit 
dos.myflorida.com/cultural. 


36 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 


'A 

AMERICANS 

ARTS 


for the 


AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS IS THE NATION’S LEADING 
NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION FOR ADVANCING THE ARTS 
IN AMERICA. ESTABLISHED IN 1960, WE ARE DEDICATED 
TO REPRESENTING AND SERVING LOCAL COMMUNITIES 
AND CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR EVERY AMERICAN TO 
PARTICIPATE IN AND APPRECIATE ALL FORMS OF THE ARTS. 



The following national organizations 
partner with Americans for the Arts to 
help public- and private-sector leaders 
understand the economic and social 
benefits that the arts bring to their 
communities, states, and the nation. 

Cover: Andrew Shurtleff Photography 

(Clockwise from Top) Concert for Miami, Knight Concert 
Hall, Miami-Dade, FL.; Photos from the Broward 100 
‘ I nsideOut' campaign “Creatives Making a Difference in 
Hollywood". Presented by the Community Redevelopment 
Agency of Hollywood and supported by the Downtown 
Hollywood Mural Project and the Art and Cultural Center of 
Hollywood, FL. Photo by Jill Weisberg.; The Pool, El Paso 
Museums & Cultural Affairs Department, TX. Photo by Jen 
Lewin.; Dancer at outdoor performance. Fulton County Arts 
Council, GA. Photo by CGC Studios. 



NATIONAL 

ASSOCIATION 

^COUNTIES 




NAG, NLC 


•S STRONG TOGETHER 


NATIONAL 
LEAGUE 
OF CITIES 


DESTINATIONS 

V./ INTERNATIONAL 



building prosperous communities together 


IGMA 

INTERNATIONAL CITY/COUNTY 
MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION 


INDEPENDENT 

SECTOR 


m 

Gra ntmakers in the Arts 

Supporting a Creative America 


I 


m 

iiiiii 


National Conference 
of State Legislatures 

The Forum for America's Ideas 



COUNCILon FOUNDATIONS 


The Conference Board 

Trusted Insights for Business Worldwide 



1000 Vermont Avenue, NW, 6 th Floor Washington, DC 20005 202.371.2830 research@artsusa.org #AEP5 

www.AmericansForTheArts.org